HomeQ&ANo quiero tratarme con esto

No quiero tratarme con esto

3
votes

Is this a way to say I don't want to deal with this? Or is this wrong? Gracias.

2196 views
updated MAY 6, 2010
posted by jeezzle

11 Answers

4
votes

NO quiero meterme en esto: I don't want any part in this.

The same as: No quiero tener nada que ver.

updated MAY 6, 2010
posted by 00494d19
6
votes

what you said is more related to a medical conversation. Is better to say "No quiero tener nada que ver con eso"

updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by el_wereke
Even "no quiero nada que ver con eso" is quite enough. - Gekkosan, MAY 5, 2010
3
votes

Another option: No quiero ocuparme con esto.

updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by mountaingirl123
2
votes

Ok so tratarse is better for a person, no quiero tratarme con ella, but ocuparse and encargarse are better for things? No quiero ocuparse/encargarse DE esto/algo?

I see them as completely different things, really. Both work for people or objects.

"No quiero tratar con ella" - "I don't want to deal with her"

"No quiero tratarme con ella" - "I don want to deal with her", or "I don't wish to be treated by her" (medically) - depending on context.

"No tratar con eso" - "I don't want to deal with that" or even "I don't want to deal in that", depending on context (Drugs, as an example for the latter option.

"No quiero ocuparme de eso" - "I don't want to deal with that" or "I don't want to be in charge of that".

"No quiero ocuparme de ella" - "I don't want to deal with her", "I don't want to take care of her".

"No quiero ocuparme con eso / con ella" - "I don't want to deal with / dedicate my time to that / her" ("I'm really busy and have lots of other things to do").

updated MAY 6, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
1
vote

No quiero encargarme de esto o de ti.

No quiero ocuparme de esto o de ti.

No quiero tratarme con ella. I don't want to have anything to do with her.

updated MAY 6, 2010
posted by 00494d19
"esto o de ti" Shouldn't this be "esto ni de ti"? - samdie, MAY 6, 2010
1
vote

FYI im going wih no quiero meterme en esto RE my mom.

updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by jeezzle
That looks like a very good choice to me! - Gekkosan, MAY 5, 2010
1
vote

No quiero encargarme de esto.

Ocuparse y encargarse de algowink

updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by 00494d19
1
vote

If you use "tratarme" as you did it comes out like, "I'm not going to take this medecine".

However "tratar" doesn't have to be reflexive so "tratar con el asunto" is fine. Used as a transitive verb (with an object) "tratar" is fine for "deal with", "manage", "sort out", "handle" etc.

Your example, then, resolves to "no quiero tratar con esto".

updated MAY 5, 2010
edited by geofc
posted by geofc
1
vote

I could be wrong, but I believe that "tratarse con" is used in reference to another person (i.e. "tratarse con alguien). For example:

No quiero tratarme con ella - I don't want to have anything to do with her

I believe that the correct way to say this (using the verb tratar) might be "tratar de esto" (in reference to discussing a particular topic). For example:

No quiero tratar de los recibos - I don't want to talk about the bills

updated MAY 5, 2010
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
0
votes

I knew there was another word like tratarse, so it's ocuparse. So "No quiero tratarme con esto" and "No quiero ocuparme con esto" are viable for "I don't want want to deal with this" but better still is "No quiero tener nada que ver con esto" (I don't want to have anything to do with this"? Of course the latter doesn't mean the same thing as "I don't want to deal with this" which is figurative and unlike tener que ver. Gracias.

updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by jeezzle
""No quiero tratarme con esto" is not really viable in this case. As Wereke said, that has more of a medical implication. I don't want to be treated with that. - Gekkosan, MAY 5, 2010
0
votes

Ok so tratarse is better for a person, no quiero tratarme con ella, but ocuparse and encargarse are better for things? No quiero ocuparse/encargarse DE esto/algo? Gracias.

updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by jeezzle
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