HomeQ&AHow many "varieties" of Spanish are there?

How many "varieties" of Spanish are there?

0
votes

How many different versions of Spanish are there. There seems to be a "european" and "latin american", but how different are they? There is also Castilian, Catalan, Basque, and more. Is there a basic underlying language, with slight global variation, or are they significantly different? I'm open to opinion, and thank all contributors in advance.

7634 views
updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by fontanero

3 Answers

3
votes

Catalán, Basque, Gallego, Valenciano, and so forth are separate languages. Similar to Spanish, yes, sort of. Not Basque. But diffent languages.

All "Spanish" languages are really Catillian - Castellano. That is the official tongue of Spain and many other countries, including most of Latin America. Technically Castellano is one single language, and its "purity" and correctness is preserved by the rulings of the Real Academia de la Lengua Española, which receives feedback and updates from its members all over the world.

There are, however, countless regional variations. More than there are countries that speak Spanish, since different regions within a country also have their own particular variations.

It is exactly the same situation with English. Can you tell how many different variations of English there are?

updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
I agree, there are many regional variations of english, but I think its fair to say there is a common language underneath it all. - fontanero, MAY 5, 2010
Are the enough similarities to be understood, which I believe is the most important thing. - fontanero, MAY 5, 2010
0
votes

HI Fontanero, welcome to the forumgrin

Please have a look at this thread, thanks.

updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Hope you don't mind if I make a plug for the language of the Val D'Aran, one of the world's smallest splinter group languages. Sadly I can't now remember what it's official name is but it's different. For a sample try the link below to the local council's site. Not only is it fascinating as a langage but also for its historical roots. It is one of the very few remaining links to the ancient language of Southern France, the Langue d'Oc which was brutally destroyed back in about the 17th century. France is just down the hill from Vielha, the principal (only) town.

http://conselharan.org/

updated MAY 5, 2010
posted by geofc
Of course I don't mind, its an open discussion. - fontanero, MAY 5, 2010
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.
SOCIAL NETWORKS
APPS