HomeQ&Amojadas recibidas a escolte

mojadas recibidas a escolte

1
vote

The above phrase occurs in the following sentence, which refers to a duel as the way to settle insults to those accused by a poet of being cuckholds:

El asunto se resolvió al caer la noche con un poco de acero tras las tapia de los Recoletos, de modo que tanto el presunto cornudo como el amigo, una vez sanaron de las respectivas "mojadas recibidas a escote," . . .

The action occurs in 16th C. Madrid, and I understand all of the sentence but the quoted phrase.

Thanks very much!

1673 views
updated MAY 2, 2010
posted by BarbaraGibbs
Don't think you mean "escote" - my dictionary "low neck" - geofc, MAY 2, 2010
yes, escote welcome to the forum, escote is not low neck here though - 00494d19, MAY 2, 2010

3 Answers

1
vote

Interesting, Barbara, I hope you will read this:

mojado, da.

  1. f. coloq. Herida con arma punzante.

A escote:

a escote. 1. loc. adv. Pagando cada uno la parte que le corresponde en un gasto común.-----in this case, the cuts were given to one and the other....

El asunto se resolvió al caer la noche con un poco de acero tras las tapia de los Recoletos, de modo que tanto el presunto cornudo como el amigo, una vez sanaron de las respectivas "mojadas recibidas a escote," . . .

These are the clues:

they resolved the problem with knives or swords behind the Recoletos area (very long and famous road in Madrid) , and they survived the respective "cuts and injuries infringed by swords or knives from one to the other"...

I am sure you can phrase that yourself much better than I.

updated MAY 2, 2010
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

de modo que tanto el presunto cornudo como el amigo, una vez sanaron de las respectivas "mojadas recibidas a escote," . . .

Hi Barbara, was that part in quotes already? Or did you put it in quotes. It sure does sound like an old quote, but escote can be neck too so it's sounding like 'once they had recovered from their respective 'wetting/damping to the neck' so maybe like they'd both had a sword cut to the neck area? My guess....

updated MAY 2, 2010
posted by margaretbl
0
votes

I agree that it doesn't make much sense, but that's what it says. That's why I think it must be an idiomatic expression that may not be in use any more. Maybe something like "having saved one's neck".

updated MAY 2, 2010
posted by BarbaraGibbs
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