The chicken is done

1
vote

So I was waiting for the chicken. It was done. I said to the cook "Eso me parece bien hecho" which was short for "Ese pollo me parece que esta bien hecho.

Maria then tells me that "bien hecho" means not "well done" as burned or getting too done, but "very good" well done like, "really good, done to perfection" and that I should use "Ese pollo me parece que ya esta" which is wierd, there is no adjective. I guess it's another case of esta meaning more than just estar. She says you wouldnt say Ese pollo me parece que ya esta hecho." I wonder about "Ese pollo me parece que habia tener bastar. Favor de dejar en paz este pollo. Gracias.

1436 views
updated MAY 2, 2010
posted by jeezzle
Jeez, you're too funny! Jaja

5 Answers

3
votes

¡Ja, ja, ja, ja, ja!! The last lines of your post are histerical!!! LOL

I agree with María.

"El pollo está" or "El pollo está listo" means "It's ready, it's cooked - let's eat!".

I think there was a thread a while back about the terms to use when meaning: "rare", "well done"; "medium" and so forth. I think those can vary a lot from one place to another.

"Ese pollo me parece que habia tener bastar", on the other hand, makes no sense whatsoever. It's funny, though. grin

updated MAY 2, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
Lol, I know I said it wrong, but you get the idea ;)
How about Ese pollo me parece que ha tenido basta
Doesn't make sense either. "Ese pollo ha tenido bastante", "That chicken's had enough": Weird, but grammatically correct.
Jeezzle when you say 'bastar' are you meaning 'the chicken has had enough already' or do you mean 'basting' like in English?
its had enough.
2
votes

When we're talking about meat (beef), "bien hecho" means well done, "tres cuatro" means medium well, etc. Of course this would not apply to pollo, but I sometimes hear "ya está" to mean "ya está terminado". Maybe this just applies to this part of the world.

updated ABR 30, 2010
posted by CalvoViejo
1
vote

"Ese pollo me parece que habia tener bastar. Favor de dejar en paz este pollo' Hi Jeezzle, couldn't make it fit in the comments section for some reason... "Me parece que ese pollo ha tenido bastante ya." I think that chicken has had enough! With the second sentence, to me it seems like it needs the personal 'a' ...a este pollo....But it's food, so... ¿Gekkosan? Someone from the night shift?

updated MAY 1, 2010
posted by margaretbl
Great. Me parece que ese pollo ha tenido bastante ya. Thank you. I will use this in "real life" (whatever that is)
1
vote

You can say "bien cocido" for "well done.

updated MAY 1, 2010
posted by nateskate29
ese pollo es bien conocido, gotcha. :)
...esta bien cocido :)
1
vote

I agree with "El pollo está listo." as in, it is done cooking, it is ready to eat.

"Me parece que ese pollo ya está." is good too. You don't necessarily need an adjective. The adverb "ya" works just fine, affirming that the chicken is ready.

updated ABR 30, 2010
posted by Stardust2212
Thank you. Your posts are very helpful.
Glad to help you! :)