HomeQ&AWhen does the word "saber" mean "to taste"?

When does the word "saber" mean "to taste"?

1
vote

Most Spanish dictionaries don't have one of the meanings for the verb "saber," "to taste," like in the sentence "Sabe a feo" (It tastes bad) or "A que' sabe?" (What does it taste like?) Why is that?

13211 views
updated MAY 3, 2012
posted by nateskate29

7 Answers

3
votes

I think you mean sabor which comes from savor, think "savoury" it savers of..." in English. Here's a linklink text

It's related to savor link text

Check out the Dictionary up there on the right, ...up there

Her's another link which does saber=to know but points out it can also be used in your sense of it.link text

updated MAY 3, 2012
edited by lagartijaverde
posted by lagartijaverde
2
votes

The word "saber" "to taste" can be used as a noun, a verb, and an intransitive verb. The word "sabor" is the noun form. You can say that a food has a good/bad flavor by saying "tiene un buen/mal sabor." If you want to describe how a food tastes, use "saber." "La comida sabe bien"- "The food tastes good." You can also use the word "rico" ("rich") to describe good foods by saying "Esta rico." To use this word as a transitive verb, that is, you describe somebody who is actually physically doing the tasting, then you would use the word "probar" - "to try, sample, taste." "Pruebo el pollo."- "I taste the chicken." "Saborear" means "to flavor." So if you add flavoring to the chicken, say, "Yo saboreo el pollo."

updated MAY 3, 2012
posted by crogers59
crogers59. Welcome to the forum. Please fill out your profile with your proficiency level is English (obviously fluent) and Spanish.Thanks.This really helps us to know what level you are at with your answers.For instance, are you a native Spanish speaker? - kdrinning, MAY 3, 2012
1
vote

Welcome to the forum, nateskate29. The verb "to taste" is "saborear". Sabor would be the noun "taste". I am not sure if "sabe" is a conjugation of "saborear" though.

updated MAY 3, 2012
posted by Rikko
no, it's not from saborear, though that would make more sense... - Lised65, MAR 7, 2012
1
vote

my dictionary has

saber a - to taste of; have the flavor of.

I think it doesn't really mean literally, like the phrase "just spit it out". Someone might say it to you if you are having troubles thinking of what to say. They don't actually mean to spit what ever is in your mouth out.

EDIT: punctuation (for clarity)

updated MAY 3, 2012
edited by CalvoViejo
posted by lauren12
1
vote

This is from the dictionary for "saber":

intransitive verb 7. to taste (tener sabor)(a of)

* saber bien/mal -> to taste good/bad
* saber a cuernos o rayos (informal figurative) -> to taste disgusting o revolting
updated MAY 3, 2012
edited by TheSilentHero
posted by TheSilentHero
1
vote

My dictionary (Concise American Heritage) has it along with the other saber idioms: saber a = to taste like.

updated MAY 3, 2012
posted by tennismom
0
votes

saber a = to taste like

saborear = to taste

it taste bad = sabe gacho/sabe bien gacho/sabe feo/sabe bien feo

updated MAY 3, 2012
edited by Rey_Mysterio
posted by Rey_Mysterio
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