HomeQ&AWhat determines when I use jarra or jarro?

What determines when I use jarra or jarro?

5
votes

If I have a water pitcher, do I say el jarro de agua or la jarra de agua? If I have a pitcher of cream, do I say la jarra de crema or el jarro de crema?

How do I determine which one to use? I am a beginner in Spanish, so please excuse my lack of understanding. Thank you.

6328 views
updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by Nilda-Ballardo

9 Answers

4
votes

Jarra is also used to mean a smaller "pitcher" or what we would call a mug. For example, you can have your cerveza in "una jarra" instead of in "una botella." I know because the first time I thought I had ordered a pitcher of beer, but it was just a mug of beer. And I was sad. blank stare

updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by chris126
Lol :) - Kiwi-Girl, MAY 25, 2010
I read this yesterday, and had to come back today to give you a vote. I am still laughing to myself about the ...And I was sad! : ) - mar959, MAY 26, 2010
2
votes

Se puede chequearlo en Wikipedia en español. Dice que un jarro puede tener una asa o no, y una jarra tiene una o dos asas. Me parace que los jarros son mas grandes. Hay jarras espcialmente por beber la cerveza.

You can check it in Wikipedia in Spanish. It says a jarro can have one handle or not, and a jarra can have one or two handles. It appears to me that jarros are bigger, There are jarras especially for drinking beer.

updated MAY 25, 2010
posted by KevinB
1
vote

Creo que este asunto es como la problema con "la bolsa" y "el bolso". La es la que es mas pequeño; el es el que es mas grande (en general). la bolsa = small bag/purse el bolso = larger bag (although not something you'd call equipaje)

updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by Thumpaholden
1
vote

agua is feminine. el is used with it so you don't have the "la a" sound. However if you use plural, it's las aguas. Others are aguila, ama, aula, ave. It also applies to ha words like hacha.

updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by motley
1
vote

Masculine and Feminine

Jarra - feminine

Jarro - masculine

updated MAY 25, 2010
posted by Hailyann
1
vote

I find that "jarra" possibly may designate a pitcher or jug with one handle. Other than that, I can't locate the precise difference.

updated MAY 25, 2010
posted by Delores--Lindsey
1
vote

I find Google Images to be a good way of determining the difference between similar words. If you do an image search for jarro and a search for jarra, there's no clear-cut distinction, but in general those pictures labelled 'jarra' are more dainty, and those labelled 'jarro' are more stout.

updated MAY 25, 2010
posted by kphoger
1
vote

"jarra" is a noun and it's feminine. So it's always going to be "la jarra". Agua is masculine but that doesn't affect the feminine noun "la jarra".

updated MAY 25, 2010
posted by mamasita_s
0
votes

Una jarra de cerveza. Una taza de café o de té. Un jarrón de flores.

Pero creo en México existen los jarros para tomar café, chocolate, atole o bebidas calientes en general. Del mismo modo, en Chile, se usa casi exclusivamente Jarro.

el jarro esta lleno de agua

Then just to confuse you you have' jarros de barro para beber' - drinking jug with spout. As in botijo, piporro smile

updated MAY 25, 2010
posted by Kiwi-Girl
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