HomeQ&AWhat does "pegado al alcor" mean?

What does "pegado al alcor" mean?

2
votes

estar pegado al alcor

3306 views
updated ABR 17, 2010
posted by Tejica

5 Answers

5
votes

I could be wrong, but if this is something you heard, rather than read- well "alcor" is the way some people in some places might pronounce "alcohol". If so, then "pegado al alcohol" means alcoholic.

updated ABR 17, 2010
edited by Gekkosan
posted by Gekkosan
1
vote

I did a search of the internet as well as a deeper reading of my big paper dictionary. I found that "Estar pegado a" can mean (among other things) "to be attached to" or "To be next to".

I would not reject "attached to a corkboard" but I'm also not ready to embrace it.

 

I also discovered that:
alcor. means:
1. m. Colina o collado. (since these 2 words seem to be complete opposites, I'll leave them for you to look up in the dictionary)
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But this all makes me think that it is more likely "pegado al alcor" means "at the side of the hill" or "next to the cow path (or common)"

¿Que pienses/What do you think?

Muchos saludos/Best regards,

Moe

updated ABR 17, 2010
posted by Moe
I think your deduction process is good. I am also delighted that this thread has produced a "new" obscure word. The only problem with your explanation is that somehow it doesn't make much sense. We'd need to see what it was written about. - Gekkosan, ABR 17, 2010
1
vote

Gekkosan,
I am quite sure you are on to something. When looking the word up I thought it was similar but... I think you are right here!!! smile

updated ABR 17, 2010
posted by Jason7R
1
vote

I learn something new every time! I didn't know 'alcor' was 'cork' - great. And maybe it means he likes to drink a bit? Sounds like an interesting expression.

updated ABR 17, 2010
posted by margaretbl
Anything I can do to help. ;) - Jason7R, ABR 17, 2010
1
vote

This has got to be an idiomatic expression but the literal translation is "to be glued to cork". Is there any more context you could give? Good luck and welcome to the forum. smile

updated ABR 17, 2010
posted by Jason7R
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