How do you say "dip?"

1
vote

I'm translating a cake -decorating guide - These are heart-shaped petals, so you're going to do out, dip in, out and close. Then go out, dip, out, close. Dip, and close.

And the best translation I can come up with is "Estos son petalos en forma de corazon, asi que vas a tirar hacia afuera, hundir para adentro, y cerrar. Luego, tire hacia afuera, hundem y cierre. Hunde y cierre."

This sounds really weird to me! I tried "inmersion" but that's even worst. Your suggestions would be greatly appreciated. smile

2445 views
updated ABR 17, 2010
posted by amillan

3 Answers

0
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Me again - now informed by daughter in law what you're talking about. In this case "dip" doesn't mean "immerse" it means "lower" like bobbing (dipping) your head or curtseying to the Queen - or whatever. Hence you can simply say "baja" for dip and all should be well.

updated ABR 17, 2010
posted by geofc
0
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Hi Amillan - please can you translate "do out, dip in, out and close" into non-cake-decorator's English, after which maybe a Spanish translation will be possible. I'm particularly confused by "do out" and by whether or not "dip in, out" can be read as "dip in and out". It's fascinating. The latter half "go out, dip, out, close" is no easier. I'm sending this to my daughter in law who makes cakes professionally in hopes that she can help me.

updated ABR 16, 2010
posted by geofc
I'm so sorry for not being clearer, you're totally on the money. It's for a video, and she has a cake decorating tip with frosting and she is describing the motion of making a pansy by "dip in and out" with the tip.
0
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A different kind of dip..."boba" (not that I have ever been called that)! smile

updated ABR 16, 2010
posted by Lucrecia