Empiezo a Currar

5
votes

Well, today is the day for new slang!

Another friend, who moved recently to Spain, just told me "pronto empiezo a currar", which left me completely blank.

He told me that's the slang word they use for "work" in the region where he is.

What other slang words do you know, in Spanish or English, that mean "to work", or "a job"?

I have heard "Chamba".


Having said that - I'd better get to work, now!!! tongue rolleye

4591 views
updated OCT 30, 2010
edited by Gekkosan
posted by Gekkosan

9 Answers

1
vote

I have heard friends from El Salvador and Guatemala say "chamba," too.

I have also heard them use "iguana" for a side job.

I have read "laburo" and found out that it meant job, but I am not sure where this is used

Also "pololo" (might be spelled wrong) and "pega" in Chile

updated ABR 27, 2010
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
Ahhh, interesting the "iguana" one. Made me think of another animal name for side job, but I'll wait and see if anyone else posts it.
could you be referring to "tigre?" I want to say that I have heard this before, but I am not sure.
"Iguana" That's a good one. I wonder if there is any relation among this, the novel, "Night of the Iguana," and "Moonlighting."
I have accepted this answer, simply because it provides the most options (and, I admit, I have a soft spot for iguanas). All the answers were good! Thanks everyone!
2
votes

In U.S. English:

  1. "Time to make the donuts" : from a popular Dunkin Donuts commercial, now meaning to get up and go to work.
  2. "gig" - usually a musical job. (We have a gig next week)
  3. "Nine to fiver" - referring to work day time of 8am - 5 p.m. (Im off to my nine to fiver; I had to get a nine to five to make enough money)
updated OCT 30, 2010
posted by AKgal
2
votes

That's right; "Chamba" is very common in Mexico. Not so common but used there as well is, "Me voy a mi esclavo."

Slave at one time was a popular slang word for work in English many years ago in the USA, although I haven't heard it used lately.

Currar.

(Del caló currar; cf. sánscr. k?noti, hacer).

  1. intr. coloq. trabajar.

  2. tr. vulg. Arg. estafar (? pedir o sacar dinero con engaños).

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

updated ABR 15, 2010
edited by 005faa61
posted by 005faa61
2
votes

Spain:

curro, currele, trabajito,

updated ABR 15, 2010
posted by 00494d19
Me pregunto si se dice "tajo" en españa, también
claro
se me olvidaba
1
vote

Hello,

En algunas partes de Colombia se dice "camellar", de camello...

updated ABR 15, 2010
posted by LuisaGomezBartle
0
votes

Yeah! In Spain they use 'currar' as work even in TV programs while tye same word in Argentinand Uruguay means to still. In argentina and Uruguay we use 'laburar' as to work. 'Laburo' is a work. It's used more than the Spanish word trabajar and comes from the Italian 'laborare'

updated OCT 30, 2010
posted by Hyptum
0
votes

Another "animal related" word for work:

In Venezuela people say "matar un tigre" (to kill a tiger) for a one-off job, or a side job that provides some supplementary income. By extension, small or supplementary jobs are often called "un tigre"; or "un tigrito".

updated ABR 15, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
0
votes

I've also heard "chamba" used by Mexicans for "work" and as a verb "chambear". I've had Mexican friends who'd say "jale" for work or "jalar" (actually meaning "to pull") as a verb for "to work".

updated ABR 15, 2010
posted by alba3
0
votes

may be your friend wanted to tell you that he's gonna get better soon, me voy a poner bien,or me voy a curar pronto

and onohter hand taking about "chamba" another slang will be,"chance", is this help you ? bye bye

updated ABR 15, 2010
posted by derasja
I think you need to take another look at the topic of this post. :-)
whattt you said