HomeQ&ASummary of slang words for "money"

Summary of slang words for "money"

8
votes

A while ago I asked for terms for money This is the list of what was sent in.

Bread (cockney "Bread and honey - money"

Dough

Dosh

Spondoolics

Splosh

It's called cheddar. (cheese)

cocoa –cacao Aztec civilization used it as money.

arroz –rice Rice was used to estimate how much money an Asian farmer had in the feudalistic society.

In Argentina:

plata: Ese tipo tiene un montón de plata!!

guita: Cuánta guita que tenés!!

Centavo/Peso/Sope: No tengo un centavo!! o No tengo un peso!! o No tengo un sope (Sope is Peso al revés)

Mango: No tengo un mango!! o Es re barato!! sale 3 mangos!!

Mosca: Tiene toda la mosca

1 luca: Me salió 1 luca (= 1000 pesos argentinos)

1 gamba: Me salió una gamba (= 100 pesos argentinos)

un palo verde: un millón de dólares

"Tela" : "Tiene mucha tela" (he has a lot of money)

"Cobre": No tengo ni un cobre" (I don't have any money)

We have had so many different denominations since I was a kid: "Peso moneda nacional', "Peso Ley", "Peso Argentino", "Austral", and "Pesos" again (actual). To have an idea of the inflation that caused all these denomination changes, just let say that 1 peso (actual) = 1,000,000,000,000 pesos moneda nacional. And that happened in only 40 years.

Bacon "Bring home the bacon."

beans---hence the bean counters! (accountants)

Bucks Dollars

Shrapnel! Just for coins, of course.

Lana - Estoy muy pobre, no tengo lana. I am poor, I have no money.

liga - Me vas a dar la liga. Give me some money.

guita - El salario de ese trabajo es muy poca guita. The salary for that job is very little money.

American/English slang:

1.grease

2.sugar

3.green(s)

4.package

5.Benjamins

6.dead Presidents

7.fat

8.moolah

9.C-note ($100. bill)

10.buck 1$

11.cheese

  1. twankie

13.scratch

14.cabbage

15.lettuce

16.loot

Mexican slang:

"lana", and "billete".

1.feria

2.plata

3.oro

Cuban:

1.baro

2.chavito

3.divisa

4.fula

I think there was a time when "moolah" or "moola" also meant money in the US. Here in the Philippines, our most common Filipino words for money are "pera" and "kwarta (I think that would have been "cuarta" except that we don't have the letter "c" in our alphabet and the letter "u" is replaced by "w" when used together with another vowel), but the "cua" sound is exactly how our "kwa" sounds. "Pera" and "cuarta" are Spanish words or at least Spanish-sounding words to us here, but I don't think they mean anything related to money in Spanish.

In Venezuela no se utiliza mucho la palabra "dinero". En el uso cotidiano, se dice "plata".

In Venezuela there are also a number of slang alternatives to "plata":

Reales,

Churupos,

guita,

pasta,

billete,

billuyo,

villegas,

morocotas,

lucas (mil),

lana,

cobres.

"Una bola e' real" "Lotsa dough"

cash, paper (referring to bills)

plastic (refers to credit card)

wonga,

Brass,

a lady (lady godiva) fiver(five pound note),

Do have you any money? are you holding?

(folding) for paper money,

a score(twenty pound note),

readies,

I have no money(as usual) I am brassic

A monkey = £500

A pony = £25 (macaroni - cockney)

A grand - £1000

A ton = £100

A nifty = £50

A fiver = £5 (lady Godivia / fiver in Cockney)

A smacker = £1

A quid - £1

Dosh

In Spanish:

dinero-money

monedas-coins

dolares-dolars

libras-pounds

Canada

A loonie 1$ coin

a tooney 2$ coin.

Guatemala and El Salvador

In El Salvodor I have heard "La papa"

Feria

pisto and billullo

Panama

Chimbilín

Spain:

duro used to be the old 5 peseta coin, it is still used to say no money, no tengo ni un duro.

napo: the old geen bill of one thousand pesetas

Una libra: one Euro (nowadays, used to be one hundred pesetas)

la pasta: dough

In Costa Rica,

I have heard "Diñar"

have also heard chivo, but I am not sure where it is used.

27634 views
updated Apr 15, 2010
edited by ian-hill
posted by ian-hill
Wow! - --Mariana--, Apr 15, 2010
Woah! - R_5_Q_U_3_L, Apr 15, 2010
In Spain, Spanish is spoken by all countries above;) - 00494d19, Apr 15, 2010
amazing, what a great idea. Thank you. Here in Canada we have a one dollar coin which we call a 'loonie' (it has a loon on it) and also a two dollar called appropriately a 'tooney'. - margaretbl, Apr 15, 2010
Added margaret thanks - ian-hill, Apr 15, 2010
Feria is used in El Salvador as well - Izanoni1, Apr 15, 2010
Great compilation by the way - Izanoni1, Apr 15, 2010

8 Answers

0
votes

In El Salvodor I have heard "La papa"

updated Apr 15, 2010
posted by derasja
0
votes

In Spain:

napo: the old geen bill of one thousand pesetas

Una libra: one Euro (nowadays, used to be one hundred pesetas)

la pasta: dough

alt text

updated Apr 15, 2010
posted by 00494d19
Do they use "colorado" in Spain, Heidita? - Izanoni1, Apr 15, 2010
And what about "duro?" - Izanoni1, Apr 15, 2010
colorado, no ; duro used to be the old 5 peseta coin, it is still used to say no money, no tengo ni un duro. - 00494d19, Apr 15, 2010
0
votes

In Costa Rica, I have heard "Diñar"

updated Apr 15, 2010
posted by R_5_Q_U_3_L
0
votes

Impressive collection, Ian!

You seem to have missed a header after: "Venezuela - 'Una bola e' real' ", since a number of English expressions follow.

updated Apr 15, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
Changed. I think - can't keep up with this :) - ian-hill, Apr 15, 2010
0
votes

W05H

updated Apr 15, 2010
posted by R_5_Q_U_3_L
How is that pronounced? Wosh? and where is it said? - ian-hill, Apr 15, 2010
0
votes

In Mexico, we also use "lana", and "billete".

updated Apr 15, 2010
posted by 00e46f15
added - ian-hill, Apr 15, 2010
0
votes

pisto and billullo are also used in Guatemala and El Salvador

Chimbilín is used in Panama

I have also heard chivo, but I am not sure where it is used.

updated Apr 15, 2010
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
0
votes

Thank you so much!!!!

updated Apr 15, 2010
posted by Fidalgo
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