HomeQ&AShe is leaving home

She is leaving home

3
votes

She is leaving from home

She is leaving home

She is getting out of home

She is going out of home

Are all of them correct? Do they mean the same?

Thank you.

1816 views
updated FEB 7, 2011
posted by nila45
I can't see how the last two would / could be used Nila. - ian-hill, ABR 10, 2010
Ccould you explain that better, Ian? Why not? - nila45, ABR 10, 2010
See my next answer. - Yeser007, ABR 10, 2010

7 Answers

3
votes

"She is leaving home" usually refers to an event such as adulthood, going out on her own into society, getting married, etc.

"She is leaving from home" tells us, of course, from where she is leaving but could be just a temporary thing like "She is leaving from home to go to the airport" or to describe her chain of actions -she's leaving from home and then on to her friends house, then she wil go to the airport from there.....

In the other 2 examples, out of homedoesn't really fit the situaton.

Your Beatle song is about my first remark. A young girl, now grown up and leaving her parents.

updated FEB 7, 2011
posted by Yeser007
OK, I have understood the answer about "from" very well. - nila45, ABR 10, 2010
1
vote

To use out of home would only be in an instance such as "She works out of home". Meaning she makes her living right from her home. We (in the USA) just don't use the term in your manner of example. The words out of typically refer to empty or lacking. I'm out of cash, we're out of gasoline. I am out of work., this is probably the best example. To say "I am out of work" at the end of a workday would mean I have no more work to go to in the future whereas "I am leaving work" would most likely be I'm going home for the night, see you tomorro. I hope this helps you out Nila.

updated ABR 10, 2010
edited by Yeser007
posted by Yeser007
1
vote

"she is getting out of home." Is that expression possible too?

No, I can't see a situation where this would be possible. If you said "She is getting out of the house" I could envision someone who's tired of living there and wants to leave.

updated ABR 10, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
1
vote

Me suena como: se va de casa, es decir, se va para siempre.

She is leaving. She is going out.

También diferente si usas una hora.

I leave home at 7.

esto es lo que diría yo.

updated ABR 10, 2010
posted by 00494d19
You have a very good nose for the usage of English. Congratulations. - nila45, ABR 10, 2010
1
vote
updated ABR 10, 2010
posted by Issabela
How cute!. - nila45, ABR 10, 2010
0
votes

"She is getting out of the house"

I see, Marianne. "To get out of the house" (dejar la casa) to go living to another place. I mean, you are going to leave that place of residence. (The house = la casa) (any house)

But if you say "she is leaving home" is a change of status. She leaves their parents' home. (The home = el hogar) (your home).

"Casa" and "hogar" can be different things, can't they?. It depends mainly on the context.

This is my home = este es mi hogar

This is my house = esta es mi casa

updated ABR 10, 2010
edited by nila45
posted by nila45
Yes, that's it! - --Mariana--, ABR 10, 2010
0
votes

She is leaving. She is going out.

I suppose "she is leaving home" is the same as "she is going out of home".

And as Yesero says: "she is leaving from home" is to describe her chain of actions.

It lacks "she is getting out of home". Is that expression possible too? Would the meaning be more or less the same?

updated ABR 10, 2010
posted by nila45
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