HomeQ&AThings for the Phrasebook ??

Things for the Phrasebook ??

7
votes

Recently Heidita used the expression THINGY (meaning she did not know what else to call something)

This reminded me of some more.

Thingamyjig.

Whatchamacallit.

Oujy.

Oujamaflip.

Howsyafather

Whatsit

Can anyone suggest some more?

Things for the Phrasebook maybe not.

But does Spanish have terms similar to these?

And if so can are we learners allowed to know them?

1789 views
updated MAR 30, 2010
posted by ian-hill

13 Answers

4
votes

Can anyone suggest some more?

Doohickey, thingamajigger, gizmo, doodah, thingamabob, doodad

updated MAR 30, 2010
posted by Izanoni1
That's the idea Iza. Great! - ian-hill, MAR 27, 2010
3
votes

Noséque.

updated MAR 30, 2010
posted by kenwilliams
3
votes

Oh my God Ian!! It's Greek to me!!!

updated MAR 29, 2010
posted by Benz
Jejeje :) - Nicole-B, MAR 27, 2010
De vez en cuando....Spanish is Greek to me also! - Nicole-B, MAR 27, 2010
Hi Benz - all the examples I gave mean the same thing or "thingy" as Heidita called it. All used when you don't know the real terminology. - ian-hill, MAR 27, 2010
jajaja thanks Ian! - Benz, MAR 27, 2010
3
votes

el "cómosellama" !

updated MAR 29, 2010
posted by mountaingirl123
3
votes

How about a bit of Cockney? wink

have a butcher's

use your loaf

she's got very nice bacons

pony and trap

horse and cart

save yourself the Barney

let's go out and have a few Britneys

what a pretty Chevy she has (this time it's cockenised American English, jeje)

updated MAR 28, 2010
edited by ian-hill
posted by Issabela
You are amazing Issabela - How on earth do you know Cockney? I grew up with it. - ian-hill, MAR 27, 2010
I was going to add the meanings but decided not too. - ian-hill, MAR 27, 2010
I was taught about it at the university :) - Issabela, MAR 27, 2010
One day, when I'm done learning Spanish, maybe I'll take on Cockney. I have heard it so many times, but I honestly can understand Spanish better. jeje - Nicole-B, MAR 28, 2010
2
votes

Don't forget the "whosiwhatsis", it goes with Heidita's thingy.

updated MAR 29, 2010
posted by Yeser007
1
vote

Oh my god, Ian-Hill, as a Brit, you of all people should understand the best use of the word "thingy." link text

Monty Python, "Tax on Thingy" sketch.

updated MAR 29, 2010
posted by 008f2974
Yes Dobert if you can skip over all the unintelligible .. a.. thingy bits and go straight to the thingy bit that just about sums up thingy - if you get my .. uh .. thingy. Have a ..um ..thingy. - ian-hill, MAR 28, 2010
1
vote

Fo shizzle. Fo sheezy. Fo rizzle. Trill. I'm at 100. Don't be trippin. Get up on it. Straight up, yo. That doesn't track. That ain't right. Cain't. If it don't make dollars it don't make sense. What's the scuz? What's the skizzle? What's the skinny? Holla.

updated MAR 28, 2010
posted by jeezzle
"Word" Jeezzle. - Nicole-B, MAR 28, 2010
I meant the street version of "word" in keeping with the rest of your "words". :) - Nicole-B, MAR 28, 2010
1
vote

This one is used on occasion in my area. I forget who coined it, but here goes:

"Lets get crackalackin!"

which means

"Let's get going!"

updated MAR 28, 2010
posted by Nicole-B
Ian, feel free to throw that into your conversations as necessary. jejeje - Nicole-B, MAR 27, 2010
0
votes

This thread was really only about finding "words" that are used to describe something when you don't know the correct one.

As an interesting sidenote the Parliament in Denmark is called "tinget" = "the thing" and in Norway Storetinget" = "the big thing"

updated MAR 30, 2010
edited by ian-hill
posted by ian-hill
Insert obvious punchline here. - 008f2974, MAR 30, 2010
0
votes

a lot of the Mexican folks here in Houston just describe what the thing does when looking for it 'Dame la cosa que cortes las verduras'

updated MAR 30, 2010
posted by HappyBuddaH
0
votes

How about phrases that are really colloquial or even a bit vulgar

Tallywhacker

updated MAR 30, 2010
posted by 008f2974
0
votes

How about phrases that are really colloquial or even a bit vulgar, e.g. "estar de mala hostia" or "ser la hostia"?

updated MAR 30, 2010
posted by Issabela
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