HomeQ&ATodos a pie

Todos a pie

1
vote

It seems like this would mean "Everyone on foot" It was used as a command in a classroom, but they cutout so I couldn't see what the kids did. Also I found this: link text

1442 views
updated MAR 18, 2010
posted by jeezzle
At first I thought the link was giving me an idea of something to do up in NY. I think I am a bit late though. Oh well. :)thoud - Nicole-B, MAR 18, 2010
Just ignore the "thoud-" after the smile. My cursor keeps jumping all over the place. It is driving me crazy. If anyone sees this and knows how to resolve the problem...PLEASE let me know! - Nicole-B, MAR 18, 2010

3 Answers

2
votes

It does mean "everyone on foot", as in "we're walking there". In the classroom context that you mention, they probably said "todos de pie": "Everyone stand up".

updated MAR 19, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
2
votes

¡Todos a pie! means that everyone must go walking... this could be said in the army. ¡Todos de pie! means... stand up!

updated MAR 19, 2010
posted by AntMexico
1
vote

I heard the teachers in the Dominican Republic use this to have everyone stand. For instance, when we were in a church service, the song leader would use that phrase when he wanted everyone to stand up and sing a song.

Hope this helps. smile

updated MAR 18, 2010
posted by Nicole-B
Tony is right about this one. Now that I see that, it is all coming back to me. jeje - Nicole-B, MAR 18, 2010
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