HomeQ&AHow do you translate the musical term "skipping" into Spanish?

How do you translate the musical term "skipping" into Spanish?

2
votes

In musical terminology there's a term known as "skipping". The Spanish translation as "saltar" or "intervalo" do not quite describe the term appropiately. Any suggestions?

2775 views
updated MAR 15, 2010
posted by lukingxyou

4 Answers

1
vote

Steps and skips

Linear (melodic) intervals may be described as steps or skips in a diatonic context. Steps are linear intervals between consecutive scale degrees while skips are not, although if one of the notes is chromatically altered so that the resulting interval is three semitones or more (e.g. C to D?), that may also be considered a skip. However, the reverse is not true: a diminished third, an interval comprising two semitones, is still considered a skip.

The words conjunct and disjunct refer to melodies composed of steps and skips, respectively.

updated MAR 15, 2010
posted by 0074b507
And the word is?This seems more up your alley - nizhoni1, MAR 15, 2010
0
votes

I´m not sure if there is a technical term, but if you play C and then E, you skip D, so what you do is Saltear Re mayor, which is a bit different from saltar.

saltear: Hacer algo discontinuamente sin seguir el orden natural, o saltando y dejando sin hacer parte de ello.

updated MAR 15, 2010
edited by mediterrunio
posted by mediterrunio
0
votes

The terms "stepping" and "skipping" can be translated directly into their Spanish equivalents. Although some musical terminology may be more difficult to understand or interpret for non-musicians (it is mostly in Italian), these terms are not.

They are usually words that are used to introduce brand new musicians to the concept of intervals or spaces between one scale note and the next. Usually musicians who have played for any amount of time drop these terms for the most part and use more complex terminology (major 3rd, minor 2nd, etc.) in describing intervals.

updated MAR 15, 2010
edited by Nicole-B
posted by Nicole-B
0
votes

Could you define "skipping" in more detail.Otherwise it is not clear why "saltar" would not suffice.

Welcome to the forum.

updated MAR 15, 2010
posted by nizhoni1
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