HomeQ&AQue me quiten lo bailado

Que me quiten lo bailado

3
votes

There is a saying in Spainish that says: Que me quiten lo bailado.

Only for curiosity, is there someone who dares to translate it into English?

I suspect it can be a bit difficult, but..... here you are. Thank you.

25225 views
updated OCT 9, 2017
edited by nila45
posted by nila45
This means: "Just try to take away what I have already done or already accomplished." - ggunders, MAR 28, 2011
The closest equivalent would just be, "Do your worst!" If you're in a really good mood, or have a terrible hangover, and want to challenge fate to (try and) take it away from you, that's the phrase we use in English. - naplb, OCT 9, 2017

12 Answers

5
votes

Nila this answer may not be what you wanted, I read your question too fast and thought we were to try to translate it into english; hopefully what I have found is interesting to somebody anyway. There's quite a bit of discussion about this on the web in spanish, I've read and tried to understand some of it lol.

'Let them take out from me all the times I've danced.' is the literal translation. I think it has a similar meaning to 'Carpe Diem' which we translate as 'seize the day', meaning 'enjoy yourself while you can'

One writer said - “Que me quiten lo bailao” significa, literalmente, que lo que ya has bailado, no te lo pueden quitar. Utilizar esta frase es una manera de aprontarse con optimismo ante la adversidad, por grande que esta sea' ` - that seems to me to be saying more than just 'enjoy yourself while you can', it seems to add on a feeling of 'although life can be hard'? or maybe that is already contained in 'Carpe Diem' and I haven't used it correctly. ;P

It's worth looking up on Youtube by the way!!!

updated JUL 2, 2012
posted by galsally
I see that in this forum there are people very efficient. I thought that you would last longer. But, you see... - nila45, MAR 14, 2010
great answer, ydal!! - 00494d19, MAR 14, 2010
I don't quite see the connection with "Carpe Diem". - lazarus1907, MAY 7, 2011
Nor do I now, Lazarus. I'm really wracking my brain to think of an English equivalent. - galsally, MAY 8, 2011
5
votes

"Que me quiten lo bailado," both the expression in general and as used in the recent song performed by L. Pérez means pretty much the same thing as the expression, "They Can't Take That Away From Me," in the famous song by George and Ira Gershwin. The sentiment of the Spanish idiom also resembles the sentiment of Rick in "Casablanca," when he tells Ilsa, "We'll always have Paris."

"Que me quiten," enlists the imperative of "quitar," which means to take away or remove. In the imperative mood, that part of the phrase means "let them take away," but as a dare--"let them try to take away." "Lo bailado," means literally "what is danced." This part of the phrase is a metaphor, a figurative way of referring to the good, happy, or enjoyable events in your life and your memory of those events. No one can take those away from you. You will always have them.

The implied character of the Gershwin song, if lamenting a lost love, still treasures memories of a lover (her looks, her words, her actions), memories no one can take away. Rick urges Ilsa, in their mutual heartbreak, to find comfort, as he seems to do, in the memory of their love affair in Paris.

The Pérez song (not on a par with Gershwin's masterpiece or with sentiments in Casablanca) looks to the future rather than the past. It insists that no one can take away the implied character's happy memories and happy moments ("lo bailado," or the figurative dances she has already danced), happy memories and happy moments that will lead her to view her life always in a positive, happy light.

updated JUL 5, 2013
posted by cdpresberg
4
votes

Wow. it is so interesting to hear how others interprate this!

FOr me it has always been this defiant proclamation - like to elaborate: you can take away my money, you can take away my house, you can hurt me the best you can, but you will never be able to take away the beautful moments of my past. you cant take away what i have danced.

I have thought of it as a way of embracing the life that is not material.The thing that matter most are not objects. perhaps it is vaguely in the spirit of "freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose"

wow, sound like such a hippy! haha.

updated OCT 15, 2012
posted by katwise
Nice addition, thanks. :) - galsally, NOV 8, 2010
This is the way I understand it too. - Gekkosan, NOV 8, 2010
I'd say best adition sor far... Just that it could refer to material matters as well. - 003e614f, OCT 15, 2012
4
votes

If you want to dance you have to pay the fiddler - qfreed

Interesting, Quentin, but I would understand this as:

If you want to enjoy yourself, you have to do something to achieve this goal.

No se me ocurre nada parecido en español.

Oh, the blog you have added is very nice, another expression:

a vivir, que son dos días,

this is very similar to the above.

updated JUL 2, 2012
posted by 00494d19
3
votes

que me quiten lo bailao (spelled differently, but explained why)

updated OCT 9, 2017
edited by nila45
posted by 0074b507
If you want to dance you have to pay the fiddler - 0074b507, MAR 14, 2010
No one says that. Ever. And it doesn't really capture the meaning of the Spanish phrase. "Do your worst!" is the closest to "Que me quiten lo bailado!" - naplb, OCT 9, 2017
3
votes

Yes, you are right. "Que me quiten lo bailao" is the same as "enjoy yourself while you can".

But as the sentence is in first person, one could say: I have already enjoyed myself while I have been able. Now, who can snatch it from me?.

updated JUL 2, 2012
edited by nila45
posted by nila45
exactly, as you said - ismarodri_uy, MAR 14, 2010
snatch it from me, take it away from me - 00494d19, MAR 14, 2010
Thank you, Heidita. "Remove" did not like to me either. But your expression sounds good to me. - nila45, MAR 14, 2010
2
votes

There must be an English equivalent for this expression, but I don't know it.

Literally means "Let them to take me off all what i have danced". It means, you can stop me now but while you didn't I had time to do a lot of things, and I'm happy for that.

updated JUL 2, 2012
posted by ismarodri_uy
2
votes

Que me quiten lo bailao! It means that I don't care about the consecuences if I had great time! Imagine, per instance, you had a great time last night and today you are too tired to do something very importa, like an exam. But, the great time you had was so worthed that you don't care if you don't pass it.

updated JUL 2, 2012
posted by lamancay
1
vote

I think it is kind of like when we say "and no one can take that away from me" because it is about something you have achieved or experienced and you are saying that it will always be with you.

Or maybe it is like saying "I'll never forget this" or even "beat that!" if you mean that no one can ever surpass what you have done. I guess there are a few ways of translating it in English but none are exactly the same as the Spanish. Every language has phrases that can't be truly translated but can only come close enough.

I hope this was helpful though.

updated OCT 9, 2017
posted by debzywebzy
This is the best answer, in terms of translating the meaning. Lots of cases where they use this phrase though it could be translated just as "Well... do your worst!" As in, good luck trying to take our fun away from us. - naplb, OCT 9, 2017
1
vote

This expression is also one of my favorites, because it is synonymous with fun and enjoy life ... but then recover costs us ... wink Let me take away what bailao (bailao = dance, dance participaiting) is used when you get to work one morning, I cast dust, after having hardly slept at all, with a very big hangover the BIG PARTY you hit yourself with the night before . So you say, look, today I am very bad, but remove away this bailao, meaning that you are worth the suffering that you are spending today by not sleeping for having been partying. So for what it's worth, to enjoy life and, although I have to recommend you to be responsible, if ever you find yourself badly after being out till late in the morning enjoying yourself without getting any sleep arriving at work in the morning asking for all to be gentle with you, asking them.....help me with my hangover= que se me quitan el bailado.

updated JUL 5, 2013
posted by eliaruba
1
vote

Let them try and take away what I have enjoyed!

updated JUL 5, 2013
posted by ignacioperezg
1
vote

The closest English expression is " you can dance all night but someone has to pay the piper"

updated JUL 2, 2012
posted by ray76
Hi, I am late to this discussion but I keeping thinking of that wonderful expression in English "tripping the light fantastic", which would not do as a translation for Que me quiten lo bailado but has the same sense of joy and defiance. Regards E. - 0074d657, MAY 22, 2011
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