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Tu te ando

0
votes

The Pimsleur Latin American course in lesson 53 at the 28:50.... the man says: Using the "tu" form... tu te ando, preguntale a la amiga. What the heck does he mean by "tu te ando" there? I can't figure it out and neither can the mexican guys at work this morning. Can anyone help out?

6738 views
updated OCT 23, 2014
posted by jeezzle

7 Answers

2
votes

It must be a mistake jeezzle... It's wrong

updated NOV 26, 2014
posted by Benz
2
votes

tutear.

  1. tr. Hablar a alguien empleando el pronombre de segunda persona. Con su uso se borran todos los tratamientos de cortesía y de respeto. U. t. c. prnl.

¡No me tutee, que no somos iguales!

updated NOV 26, 2014
edited by LuisCache
posted by LuisCache
2
votes

Hasta donde yo sé, el verbo es "tutear", es decir, dirigirse a una persona de modo informal utilizando la forma "tú", en lugar del formal "usted". "Tuteando" es la acción en gerundio de ese verbo.

As far as I know, the verb is "tutear", meaning to address a person in a familiar mode"tú", instead of the formal "usted". "Tuteando" is the action in gerund of the verb.

updated NOV 26, 2014
edited by pacofinkler
posted by pacofinkler
Así es, pero suena mejor decir "Por lo que sepa yo, ............" - 005faa61, OCT 23, 2014
Oye! Julián - pacofinkler, OCT 23, 2014
2
votes

I took the Pimsleur course, too. The English speaker says, "Using the tu form," and the Spanish speaker says, "Tuteando." They want you to use "tu" and corresponding conjugations instead of "usted."

updated NOV 26, 2014
posted by Winkfish
exactly - 005faa61, OCT 23, 2014
1
vote

I figured it out. There is verb called "tutear" which means "to treat someone as if they are in tu form" Tuteando means "Treating someone as if they are in tu form...."

updated NOV 26, 2014
posted by jeezzle
Yes, instead of using "usted" we use "tú" and it's call "tutear"... do you think it's the word? don't you remember the context? - Benz, MAR 9, 2010
The context is listed above in my original message. I believe he is using tuteando from tutear. Thanks for your help. - jeezzle, MAR 9, 2010
0
votes

I think jeezzle has the best answer. The verb is tuteando and it means to speak in a familiar manner. For example if you work for a relative he or she may tell you, "At work you use Usted, but at home we can speak TUTEANDO".

updated OCT 23, 2014
posted by ElBango
0
votes

Tú teando means second person singular or familiar form. Usted is second person plural or formal form.

updated OCT 22, 2014
posted by ElBango
Tú teando is totally wrong. What are you talking about? - DualG, OCT 22, 2014
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