what is the easiest way to learn spanish besides taking classes?

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What is the easiest way to learn spanish besides taking tons of boring and hard courses?

2764 views
updated JUL 22, 2010
posted by sfmartin1996

9 Answers

6
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While there have been many great suggestions here, I'd like to point out that you won't learn Spanish by doing any one thing.

You need a multifaceted approach if you're really going to learn it.

I do the lessons here. I listen to CDs when I'm driving.

(Learn in your Car Spanish and Learning Spanish Like Crazy. Both really help me with pronunciation and vocabulary.)

I watch the series Destinos. I have a penpal. I changed my Facebook, Yahoo, and Twitter interfaces to Spanish. I read the Spanish signs at Lowes.

Do whatever you can, as much as you can.

updated JUN 3, 2013
posted by Goyo
Ha, I read the Spanish signs at Lowe's, too. :))
6
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  1. Folow this forum and look into a few of the lessons here (they're certainly not boring smile)
  2. Get a boyfriend that speaks Spanish, and only Spanish raspberry
  3. go on a holiday to one of the many beautiful countries where they speak Spanish wink
  4. Listen to Spanish music
  5. Watch Spanish children programs

You need the boring lessons tho to really be able to use the language in the right way (specially for the grammar)

updated MAR 8, 2010
posted by Alrisaera
"2. Get a boyfriend that speaks Spanish, and only Spanish" I HOPEyou didn't try that one... :O
I loved your answer Alrisaera!! It's sooo positive. Classes are not supposed to be boring!!! Change your teacher... or change your attitude :)
specially for especially (haven't seen that in awhile) Nice variance.
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Practice!

~reading Newspapers

~writing

~grammar SpanishGrammarGenius

~listening Notes in Spanish News In Slow Spanish MusicOnBatanga Spanish Podcast Audiria Coffee Break Spanish

~conjugating Conjuguemos SpanishVerbConjugationTrainer SpanishNewYork

~lessons here on SpanishDict

~Spanish Language Resources on donQuijote

~SpanishClassOnline has a little bit of everything, so does StudySpanish

~do your homework cheese

~don't be afraid to learn new words LAITS Trent

updated JUL 22, 2010
edited by MeEncantanCarasSonrisas
posted by MeEncantanCarasSonrisas
News In Slow Spanish: checking it right now. Awesome link ! Thanks
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I would add this to what MeEncantCa said.

Don't be afraid to make mistakes.

updated MAR 8, 2010
posted by h1deaway
That... is 1 of the most important things. Don't be shy to try and fail !
That's a big one... If you are too afraid to make mistakes, you'll never learn because you will be too afraid to do what you don't already know. And if you do that, you'll never learn anything wheter Spanish, chemistry, lit., math...
2
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By being born in a country where Spanish is the dominant spoken language (of course, it takes about 6-7 years that way).

updated MAR 8, 2010
posted by samdie
that's to easy! :)
Excellent point (about the time frame).
I am correcting my grammar... "that's toO easy!" :)
1
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Apply for the position of the Taco Bell Chihuahua....'Yo quiero Taco Bell'

updated MAR 8, 2010
edited by bdclark0423
posted by bdclark0423
hahaha very funny :D
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Welcome to the forum. In my opinion, there is no true "easy," way to learn Spanish. Dedication, and discipline, along with love of the subject material, are three essentials for the task. There are many tools to use with the three aforementioned essentials, and this forum is one of the better ones.

updated MAR 8, 2010
posted by 002262dd
Edit: This forum is one of the *BEST :D
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:that's to (sic) easy!

Actually, it's one of the most inefficient ways to learn a language (although it usually produces the best/most in-depth knowledge of the language). Obviously, children, in addition to learning their "native" language spend a great deal of their time learning non-language relate issues (their culture, how people interact, some simple laws of physics, etc.). From the language point of view, they usually are left to figure out a great deal of grammar for themselves (by trial and error).

The adult learner of a second language has a great deal of language experience to draw upon (granted, some of it will be more of an obstacle than a help but there is a fundamental knowledge of "how language works" that should be helpful [if one can ignore some of the particulars]). Typically, the child is required to infer all of the rules by himself based on nothing more than injunctions such as "Don't say X say Y." or, worse, yet, on seeing a look of incomprehension on someone's face.

Many people resist the idea of learning "grammar". This is silly. When one learns ones native language, on also learns grammar. The difference is that, as a child, it is necessary to figure out the grammar by oneself. It is not presented as a neat collection of rules/practices but, rather, as hundreds (perhaps, thousands) of examples and the child is expected to figure out on his own any possibly unifying principles.

Perhaps it can be argued that a small child is incapable of the kind of "abstract" reasoning required to understand the "rules of grammar" and can only learn by (many) examples but this is certainly not the case for adults. For normal adults, it is sufficient to explain a rule and provide a few examples by way of illustration, rather than, hundreds of examples and say "OK, now you figure out what's going on."

Ask yourself, "What would be the reaction of users, if every question about "Why does one say ...?" were answered with "That's the way it's said." No appeal to grammar, no logic, no attempt to relate the expression to any other language nor any other similar construction in the same language. This is, however, exactly the way children are taught their native languages. Rather than being thought "easy" it should be thought a "minor miracle" that children learn to speak at all.

updated MAR 8, 2010
posted by samdie
0
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Purchase Rosetta Stone for Spanish. grin

updated MAR 8, 2010
posted by Cyclophane