HomeQ&AChallenge - Money Terms, Phrases, Expressions

Challenge - Money Terms, Phrases, Expressions

3
votes

Have you ever noticed how many references to water or liquid are used in English when we discuss money?

For example: He has no liquid assets.

I want to see how many others we can come up with. I also would like to know if there are corresponding terms in Spanish.

For those of you learning English, you might want to pay attention, because they probably wouldn't ordinarily make sense to someone who hadn't heard them used repeatedly.

I've already given the first one.

He has no liquid assets. El está ilíquido.

7985 views
updated ABR 8, 2012
edited by h1deaway
posted by h1deaway
"activo líquido o activo circulante"... I've never heard "ilíquido" in Spanish :) - Benz, MAR 3, 2010
Él no tiene... - Benz, MAR 3, 2010
or just: "Él no tiene liquidez" - Mokay, MAR 3, 2010

23 Answers

3
votes

El dinero abajo el desagüe.

Money down the drain.

(To lose or waste money.)

Corrections appreciated. confused

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by 00d7cd75
3
votes

Swimming in the money. (Eminem & Kanye)

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by albert-fabrik-
3
votes

You don't want to be "under water." (drowning in debt)

During a credit crunch like this one, you do want to be "liquid." (with adequate cash reserves)

You don't want to have your "assets frozen." (have the bank seize their collateral)

During a real estate market in which prices are rising, they say, "All boats rise with the tide." (meaning you don't have to be smart to make money, you just have to have to be invested)

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by JoyceM
Excellent, excellent, excellent. - h1deaway, MAR 5, 2010
3
votes

Money laundering.

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by albert-fabrik-
3
votes

drowning in debt

ahogando en deuda

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by gloriadean
3
votes

Can you float me a small loan?

¿Puede flotarme un poco de dinero? ¿Puede prestarme un poco de dinero?

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by h1deaway
3
votes

How about the phrase "awash in red ink" meaning "in debt"?

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by LaBurra
Yes, exactly. - h1deaway, MAR 4, 2010
2
votes

Cold hard cash.

Water can be cold (frío) Water can be hard.(dureza)

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by MexGuy
2
votes

No, I mean things like cashflow. Water flows.

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by h1deaway
2
votes

I've got loads of dough. Now, I know dough isn't a liquid, but it is gelatinous, not quite solid. I really couldn't think of any direct references to water or liquid.

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by Evan99
2
votes

Do you have some liquid soap I could use?

Tienes un poco de jabón líquido que pueda usar?

updated MAR 5, 2010
posted by Benz
serious?? haha. I've never heard that one before! - Evan99, MAR 3, 2010
We use liquid soap and the term exists in English... look it up in the dictionary and see jajajaja :) - Benz, MAR 3, 2010
how do you use liquid soap in terms of cash? - MexGuy, MAR 4, 2010
jajaja not in terms of cash!! sorry I misunderstood!! jajaja - Benz, MAR 4, 2010
No problem. I think my question was worded quite poorly. - h1deaway, MAR 5, 2010
1
vote

The money began to trickle in

updated MAR 6, 2010
posted by albert-fabrik-
1
vote

A million dollars is just a drop in the bucket to him.

updated MAR 6, 2010
posted by albert-fabrik-
1
vote

When the bank cancelled his line of credit, his liquidity dried up, and his business folded. Liquidity is the life blood of a business.

When the bank cancelled his line of credit, he had no readily available funds to transact business, and his business folded. Readily available funds are the determining factor to the success of a business.

When his major tenant moved to another building, he lost an important rent stream, and his business suffered. In fact, he was under water until he found a new tenant. Once the new tenant started to pay rent, he was able to right the ship.

When his major tenant moved to another building, he lost an important source of income, and his business suffered. In fact, his expenses exceeded his income until he found a new tenant. Once the new tenant started to pay rent, his income was adequate to meet his expenses.

updated MAR 6, 2010
posted by JoyceM
liquidity and stream are both excellent, I don't see the connection to 'liquid' in the others. Did I miss something? - h1deaway, MAR 6, 2010
1
vote

The business has sufficient reserves to stay afloat for six more months. El negocio tiene reservas suficientes para mantenerse a flote por seis meses más.

updated MAR 5, 2010
edited by h1deaway
posted by h1deaway
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