HomeQ&ATranslation Exercise for Beginners: Number 12

Translation Exercise for Beginners: Number 12

5
votes

This is a thread specifically designed with beginners in mind. If other exercises intimidate you this one shouldn't! Keep in mind that it doesn't matter if you don't get it all right. The actual process of attempting translation, and then correcting yourself is what helps us learn!

There are three rules:

  • Don't look at other people's translations until you have made your own.
  • Do not use a translation engine. (Although you can use a dictionary)
  • Do vote for the best answers and this thread. If there is a tie, votes make a difference.

So here is our sentence for Number 12:

"Cuando hay gente unida que cree en algo firmamente, ya religión, política, o sindicato, algo sucede."

César Chávez

Please remember to answer and then vote! This helps our thread and helps to choose a winner because if there is a word-for-word tie the answer with the most votes wins! The winner automatically recieves 20 reputation points not counting any votes he/she may have garnered. Every participant receives a vote from me as well for participating. Keep in mind that if you need some time to come up with an answer and if the thread disappears you can find it under the category: Games and Challenges. Have fun! The translation will be posted on Wednesday.

2323 views
updated MAR 13, 2010
posted by renaerules

13 Answers

1
vote

"Cuando hay gente unida que cree en algo firmamente, ya religión, política, o sindicato, algo sucede."

César Chávez

When there are a united people who believe firmly in something, whether religion, politics or unions, something happens.

César Chávez

Not sure how to handle the "ya".

updated MAR 13, 2010
posted by 00d7cd75
Very good translation here, Ken! If it weren't for that pesky "ya" it would be stellar! You win this time....I think it is about time...how many times have you been second? - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
Thank you, Rena. Very nice of you - I would hate to have to make the judgement. I was trying to make the "ya" somehow fit with "already". As an aside, does renaerules mean you rule the road, as in a roadrunner? - 00d7cd75, MAR 4, 2010
Actuall, that is a good meaning too! I did medal last summer in a 10 kilometer trail race! But "renaerules" reminds me that life is what I make of it. I live by this mantra, to rule every moment of life and not allow life to rule me. - renaerules, MAR 13, 2010
2
votes

When there are united people who believe firmly in something, religion, politics, or the union, immediately something suceeds.

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by Aamos
Good Job! You are missing the understanding of the implied meaning of "ya". See the explanation below. - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
You don't need "immediately" - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
2
votes

This my attempt - not sure if the "sindicato" only refers to "workers' rights" though.

It could be "unions" in general

"Cuando hay gente unida que cree en algo firmamente, ya religión, política, o sindicato, algo sucede."

When there are people who are united, in religion, politics or workers' rights THEN something happens.

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by ian-hill
Hey Ian! It would completely look like I was playing favorites if I chose your answer...I had to turn poor Chaparrito down last time, too! Since this is a beginners exercise, intermediates have a handicap! You have to get it perfect! - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
Yes I know you are perfect, but we will discuss this later! ;) - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
2
votes

Cuando hay gente unida que cree en algo firmamente, ya religión, política, o sindicato, algo sucede

When there are united people who firmly believe in something, religion, politics or union, something finally happens.

This one took me a whole night to think about it..

Didn't know a little word like "ya" could cause so much trouble ohh

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by Alrisaera
Hmm... I see that everyone went with "whether" which was also my first idea. Wonder if I should have sticked with it :P - Alrisaera, MAR 1, 2010
Very good! All you lack is the understanding of "ya". I know "something finally happens is the attempt to deal with this word, but that is not quite it! See my explanation below! :) - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
1
vote

"Cuando hay gente unida que cree en algo firmamente, ya religión, política, o sindicato, algo sucede." - César Chávez

"When there are people together that believe in something strongly, whether religion, politics, or union, things happens." - César Chávez


I changed it a little, I don't know if that fixed the problem your referring to though renae...

updated MAR 3, 2010
edited by hlsbookworm
posted by hlsbookworm
Very good! You take second this time mostly due to the use of "people together". It is a fine substitution, but in this sentence, it is obvious that the author is using the specific word "united". - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
yeah, I was trying to go for something different, since I figured everyone would do "united" - hlsbookworm, MAR 3, 2010
1
vote

When people are united who believe in something strongly, (as) religion, politics or trade unions, something happens.

I could not find a word that would fit into the ya so I added (as) in its place. If I were to translate this as to make it more understandable and emphazise it better in English, I would have said something such as, something always happens. Something happens all the time but with such staunch beliefs it always happens, making it a definite.

Cuando hay gente unida que cree en algo firmamente, ya religión, politica. o sindicato, algo sucede.

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by teresa3101
Unfortuanetly, "as" is not the correct substitution in this case! Very good on everything else! See below for the explanation... - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
1
vote

When united people firmly believe in something, whether religion, politics, or a workers' union, it is a success.

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by CrazyDiamond
Yes, the adverb isn't technically grammatically correct, but, like Captain Kirk, I prefer to boldly go rather than go boldly. - CrazyDiamond, FEB 28, 2010
I like how you boldly go! ;) See the explanation for "ya" below. "it is a success" does read smooth, however I have to choose someone that translated true to the intent of the sentence! Don't let that stop you from being creative! - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
1
vote

When people are united who believe in something steadfastly, whether religion, politics, or worker's rights, something happens.

The "something happens" sounds really awkward but I don't know how to translate it better.


My attempt at an edit after the "ya" hint (although I probably bungled it worse):

When people are united who believe in something steadfastly, immediately religion, politics, or worker's rights, aught to succeed.

updated MAR 3, 2010
edited by alice_m
posted by alice_m
Very good! Unions or workers rights are both acceptable You need: when people who are united believe. Thanks for the awesome attempt to try again, although I think the first attempt was more accurate. - renaerules, MAR 3, 2010
0
votes

Congratulations, Ken for writing the most true blue translation possible with the given circumstances! You are best answerer after running second so many times!


Congatulations everyone for a really devoted job to this exercise! I was hoping that someone would be struck with the obvious answer! I know I was a little hard on you this time, but I thought this sentence would be a valuable tool to learn how to derive meaning from a sentence when it is implied.

So here is the long awaited explanation:

I will start by inserting the implied meaning:

Cuando hay gente unida que cree en algo firmamente, ya (seá) religion, (ya seá) política, o (ya seá) sindicato, algo sucede.

Like this our English minds can now fathom how the sentence should read:

When there are united people who firmly believe in something, now it will be religion, now it will be politics, now it will be unions, things happen.

This still does not make sense in English, so we have to ponder how to state the same meaning in a manner that "makes sense", but is true to the intention of the author. If we return to the original sentence we see that "ya" is implied for all three words, religion, politics and unions but only need be used once. This means we want to simplify the English version too. It would naturally follow that we should restate it this way:

When there are united people who firmly believe in something, now religion, now politics, now unions, things happen.

We are getting closer! But we, as English speakers, would never state a sentence this way! Here is where our practice with our language comes in! Let's tighten it up and polish it up a bit!

When there are united people who firmly believe in something, now religion, here politics, or there a union, things happen.

Beautiful huh?

Thank you everyone for participating! I had fun. See you at Number 13!

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by renaerules
0
votes

Last chance!

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by renaerules
0
votes

We are on the last leg of our journey with Exercise Number 12: Now would be the time to give it a try, vote or edit! (whichever side of the coin you are on!) See you tomorrow!

updated MAR 2, 2010
posted by renaerules
0
votes

Hi everyone! We have one more day before the English translation is due. Any more ready to rise to the challenge?!

updated MAR 1, 2010
posted by renaerules
0
votes

Because this particular translation exercise has an implied meaning to it, I am going to leave you a hint and a chance to attempt an edit!

Hint: Just because the word is small and doesn't seem to affect the sentence does not give you license to ignore it. There is a reason it is there. How would you say this sentence in English for it to make sense?

updated MAR 1, 2010
posted by renaerules
ok, for the life of me, I can't figure out what word your talking about....?? - hlsbookworm, MAR 1, 2010
I gues she means the word "ya" since it's little and annoying :P - Alrisaera, MAR 1, 2010
Looking forward to the explanation. :) - 00d7cd75, MAR 1, 2010
:) - renaerules, MAR 1, 2010
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