HomeQ&Aarroz con mango (gracias)

arroz con mango (gracias)

0
votes

what does these mean? if you can answer just one that would be very helpful! thanks!

(the English equivalent and literal meaning, please let me know which is which, thanks)

cabeza de chorlito

te coji con las manos en la masa

me estas tomando el pelo

lobos de una camada

la ropa sucia se lava en casa

empujando margaritas

las yerbas malas no mueren

sin huesos

lo que se mama no se olvida

arroz con mango

4312 views
updated ENE 24, 2012
edited by CubaLibre68
posted by CubaLibre68
Do you need the english equivalent? I think I misunderstood you... :) - Benz, FEB 27, 2010
What do these mean? - Eddy, ENE 24, 2012

8 Answers

3
votes

"Cabeza de chorlito" usually "Qué cabeza de chorlito!" (absent-minded, not very intelligent, it's not offensive)

.

"te agarré con las manos en la masa" I found you doing something you were not suppossed to do

.

"me estás tomando el pelo" you're pulling my leg

.

"la ropa sucio se lava en casa"... if we have problems at home, we try to work them out puertas adentro (inside)

.

"yerba mala nunca muere" bad people live longer

.

"la sin hueso" if this is what you mean it refers to the tongue... Example: no para de mover la sin hueso... (she/he speaks a lot)

.

updated FEB 28, 2010
posted by Benz
gracias! - CubaLibre68, FEB 27, 2010
2
votes

"Cabeza de chorlito" usually "Qué cabeza de chorlito!" (absent-minded, not very intelligent, it's not offensive)

.

"te agarré con las manos en la masa" I found you doing something you were not suppossed to do

.

"me estás tomando el pelo" you're pulling my leg

.

"la ropa sucio se lava en casa"... if we have problems at home, we try to work them out puertas adentro (inside)

.

"yerba mala nunca muere" bad people live longer

.

"la sin hueso" if this is what you mean it refers to the tongue... Example: no para de mover la sin hueso... (she/he speaks a lot)

.

updated FEB 27, 2010
posted by Benz
Thanks soo much, this is exactly what I needed! gracias! - CubaLibre68, FEB 27, 2010
Yea "tomar el pelo" is real common -- I even use this one in conversations. - Daniel, FEB 27, 2010
1
vote

arroz con mango - rice with mango

updated ENE 24, 2012
posted by Arturo987
Ah, but do you know what this means? This is a good one! :-) - Gekkosan, ENE 24, 2012
1
vote

I'll do one and let others have fun with it...

"te coji con las manos en la masa" - I caught you with your hand in the cookie jar!!!

cool smile

updated FEB 27, 2010
posted by mountaingirl123
gracias! - CubaLibre68, FEB 27, 2010
1
vote

By coincidence, I have just learned this one:

la ropa sucia se lava en casa

In English we have an equivalent expression:

One shouldn't air one's dirty laundry in public.

updated FEB 27, 2010
posted by Janice
0
votes

"las yerbas malas no mueren" can also translate to badasses don't die. It's a way to "cumpliment" someone that even he is ill, there's no need to worry.

updated ENE 24, 2012
posted by gnomodomal
0
votes

What we more often say in English, Benz, for

"yerba mala nunca muere" bad people live longer

(-- well, with regard to the "bad people living longer" part) -- is that

the good die young!

You are probably also already familiar with this famous quotation from Shakepeare's Julius Ceaser.

The evil that men do lives after them, The good is oft interred with their bones,

updated FEB 27, 2010
posted by Janice
Interesting Janice... Thank you !! - Benz, FEB 27, 2010
I love Shakespear -- Julius Ceaser is awesome. I have a 1885 copy given to me as a gift. - Daniel, FEB 27, 2010
Caesar - samdie, FEB 27, 2010
0
votes

me estas tomando el pelo means "are u kidding me." i'll let the others people answer the rest.

updated FEB 27, 2010
posted by spanish8595
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