HomeQ&AHayas ido vs. has ido

Hayas ido vs. has ido

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Hello everyone,

In the song "Entre el mar y una estrella" by Thalia, the following lyrics are used at the beginning:

"Aunque te hayas ido, sigues conmigo, siento el respiro de tu amor"

I've noted that she has used the present subjunctive form of the verb Ir. My question is this: if she were to use the present perfect form of the verb (has ido), how would that change the intent of the lyrics?

Would it change from: "Even though you are gone, follow me, I feel the breath of your love" to "Even though you have gone, follow me, I feel the breath of your love" ?

I'm just having a little trouble understanding why the subjunctive was used.

Thanks in advance!

10043 views
updated FEB 21, 2010
posted by aaronjosh

3 Answers

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First, a comment on your grammar terminology.

"Aunque te hayas ido, sigues conmigo, siento el respiro de tu amor"

I've noted that she has used the present subjunctive form of the verb Ir.

She used the present tense, subjunctive mood of the the verb Haber (hayas); not Ir. Ido is the past participle of the verb IR.


The choice of either the subjunctive or indicative mood is dictated by the meaning of the aunque:

Aunque (although, even though, even if). The indicative is used if a fact is involved or the outcome is known; otherwise the subjunctive is used: (this includes when aunque refers to the future)

  • Lo haré aunque no le gusta. I'll do it, even though she doesn't like it. [Indicative It is a fact that she doesn't like it.]

  • Lo haré aunque no le guste. Ill do it, even though she may not like it. [Subjunctive]' (we don't know if she likes it or not).

updated FEB 21, 2010
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
Gracias! - aaronjosh, FEB 20, 2010
Indeed I agree that "ir" is not in the present subjunctive as contended by aaronjosh. - Janice, FEB 21, 2010
1
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Hi Quentin, hi aaronjosh,

Although I think I understand your answer, Quentin (thank you), I'm wondering if it is really quite right to say that

She used the present tense, subjunctive mood of the the verb Haber (hayas); not Ir.

Certainly "hayas" is the present subjunctive of the verb haber. But haber also takes the role of an auxiliary in the conjugation of other verbs. Notice what the conjugation tool gives me for "ir" :

Perfect Subjunctive

Present Perfect Subjunctive

  • haya ido
  • hayas ido
  • haya ido
  • hayamos ido
  • hayáis ido
  • hayan ido
updated FEB 21, 2010
posted by Janice
I didn't mean to imply that that the present perfect wasn't involved, just that the verb in the present subjunctive was not ir, but haber. Sorry for the confusion. - 0074b507, FEB 20, 2010
I agree! The problem was with aaronjosh's contention that the verb was in the present subjunctive! - Janice, FEB 21, 2010
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i don't have an answer, but i still wanted to comment on this answer. I am in AP Spanish, and i have to admit, that answer was satisfying. smile

gracias a todos!

updated FEB 20, 2010
posted by NancyLam
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