Is there any difference between "have" y "have got"?

3
votes

From my point of view they sound the same and what is more, I have found a link talking about the subject. Anyway, I would like to know your opinions after reading the contents of the link. Thank you.

have and have got

7494 views
updated FEB 14, 2010
edited by nila45
posted by nila45
I hope it not to be too difficult for you. Anyway, you can give your own opinions. I need to contrast the information.

9 Answers

3
votes

Hi again Nila I think you got the idea from my previous answer - but it is a bit confusing. here is another attempt.

have got means the same as have when we talk about possession.

But the form is different in the negative and in questions.

Examples:

I have got a cat = I have a cat.

He has got a dog. = He has a dog.

We have got a horse. = We have a horse.

They have got a parrot. = They have a parrot.

Negative

Examples:

I haven’t got a cat. = I don’t have a cat. NOT - I don't have got a cat.

He hasn’t got a dog. = He doesn’t have a cat.

We haven’t got a horse. = We don’t have a horse.

They haven’t got a parrot. = They don’t have a parrot.

Questions

Examples:

Have I got a cat? = Do I have a cat? NOT - Do I have got a cat?

Has he got a dog? = Does he have a dog?

Have we got a horse? = Do we have a horse?

Have they got a parrot? = Do the have a parrot?

How many cats have I got? = How many cats do I have?

How many dogs has he got? = How many dogs does he have?

How many horses have we got? = How many horses do we have?

How many parrots have they got? = How many parrots do the have?

Have you got a dog? Yes, I have. = Do you have a dog? Yes, I do.

Have you got a cat? No, I haven’t. = Do you have a cat? No, I don’t.

updated FEB 13, 2010
edited by ian-hill
posted by ian-hill
I think all pupils in your class are interested in your lecture
4
votes

Hi Nila I don't think you are referring to the verb "to have to" (tener que) but just the difference between "have" and "have got"

The differences between 'have' and 'have got' can be confusing for beginners. Here is a guide the two forms.

Remember these important points:

• 'Have' and 'Have got' are used for possession.

Example: Jack has got a beautiful house. OR Jack has a beautiful house.

Only 'have' is used when talking about actions.

Example: I usually have breakfast at 8 o'clock. NOT I usually have got breakfast at 8 o'clock.

• The question form for 'have' follows regular present simple:

Example: Do you have a fast car? NOT Have you a fast car?

• 'Have' and 'Have got' are only used in the present simple. Use 'have' for the past simple or future forms.

Example: She had a copy of that book.

• There is no contracted form for 'Have' in the positive form. The contracted form is used for 'have got'

Example: I have a red bicycle. OR I've got a red bicycle. NOT I've a red bicycle.

Here is a grammar chart showing the construction of the two forms:

Positive I, You, We, They HAVE GOT

Subject + have + got + objects

They have got a new car. Contracted: They've got a new car.

Positive He, She, It HAVE GOT

Subject + has + got + objects

He has got a new car. Contracted: He's got a new car.

Positive I, You, We, They HAVE

Subject + have + objects

They have a new car. There is no contracted form Positive He, She, It HAVE

Subject + have + objects

She has a new car. There is no contracted form Question I, You, We, They HAVE GOT

(?) + have + subject + got?

How many children have you got? There is no contracted form Question He, She, It HAVE GOT

(?) + has + subject + got?

How many children has he got? There is no contracted form Question I, You, We, They HAVE

(?) + do + subject + have?

How many children do you have? There is no contracted form Question He, She, It HAVE

(?) + does + subject + have?

How many children does he have? There is no contracted form Negative I, You, We, They HAVE GOT

Subject + have + not + got + objects

We have not got a dog. Contraction: We haven't got a dog. Negative He, She, It HAVE GOT

Subject + has + not + got + objects

She has not got a dog. Contraction: She hasn't got a dog. Negative I, You, We, They HAVE

Subject + do + not + have + objects

They do not have a dog. Contraction: They don't have a dog. Negative He, She, It HAVE GOT

Subject + does + not + have + objects

She does not have a dog. Contraction: She doesn't have a dog.

updated FEB 13, 2010
edited by ian-hill
posted by ian-hill
1000% perfect
But, she is going to get a dog and when she has gotten it.............
But .. what has that got to do with "have" and "have got" ?????
Anyway - she will already have the dog "when she has gotten it" - so she won't be going to get it.
Got you in one!
1
vote

From my point of view they sound the same and what is more, I have found a link talking about the subject. Anyway, I would like to know your opinions after reading the contents of the link.

From my point of view--that is from the point of view of someone born in the United States and who has lived the majority of his life in the southern and midwestern states--the use of "has/have got" is extremely colloquial and widely used.

By "colloquial," I don't necessarily mean that it is substandard but that it is more characteristic of conversation and informal writing and should probably be avoided in more formal writing. One reason, I suppose, that this type of construction should be avoided in formal writing is that it is an example of periphrasis or circumlocution--the use of many words where one or a few would do.

That being said, in everyday conversational speaking and writing, it is quite common to use this type of construct, and it has two general uses.

1). To show possession

• I've got brown hair --> I have brown hair

• you've got two ears --> you have two eyes

• she's got a big mouth --> she has a big mouth

2). To show obligation

• I've got to get that game --> I have to get that game

• I've got to do the dishes --> I have to do the dishes

However, there are a lot of examples where "have" y "have got" are interchangeable.

Notwithstanding its use in formal writing, I think that you have made a fair assessment. One point that I would like to make is that, in my own experience, the have/has is generally contracted with the pronoun rather than spelled out (i.e. I've/you've/we've vs. I have/you have/we have). Again this is only a generality, and the exception to this "rule" is that the non-contracted form is often employed to allow for emphasis to be added, especially in conversational use. This generally occurs so that either the "have" or the "got" can be inflected to place emphasis. Similar emphasis can be created, however, by using the auxiliary verb "do" or an appropriate adverb. For example:

1). Possesion

• "You have got two ears don't you, why don't you try and use them" --> "You do have two ears don't you..."

• "She has got a big mouth" --> "She does have a big mouth"

2). Obligation

• "I have got to wash these dishes" --> "I absolutely must wash these dishes"

• "I have got to purchase that game" --> "I definitely have to purchase that game"

updated FEB 14, 2010
posted by Izanoni1
A good decision, Izanoni. Now I am quieter after having seen your examples.
1
vote

Well have got can be used for obligation. It work as good translation of tener que. Some on the blog mentioned that it implies a stronger sense of obligation that have to. It might be I am not sure. You could just as easily use have and have to.

updated FEB 13, 2010
posted by BellaMargarita
Coloquially we say for example: I am so hungry, I have just got to eat something soon. The "got" adds emphasis..
The "just" adds the emphasis here.
1
vote

However, there are a lot of examples where "have" y "have got" are interchangeable.

I have got brown hair.

I have brown hair.

I have got two ears.

I have two ears.

And what about: I have maths before break and I have got maths before break?.

Can both of them be used?

updated FEB 13, 2010
posted by nila45
Yes is the answer in the context you used.
1
vote

As a Brit, we try to avoid the use of got unless it is necessary. I will use some of gfreed's examples.

I've got to go - I have to go

He has got to study harder - he has to study harder

I have got to leave now - I have to leave now.

From where did you get that? - I got it from the garden.

Have you (got) a cold? - Yes, I have (got) a cold. In this last example, the question and answer works with or without the word "got". In that case, why use it when it is not necessary?

updated FEB 13, 2010
posted by 00e8f2fa
Between us, Martinj, I think the same. Why to use "got" when it is not necessary?
The use of got is not necessary but we do use it - it just has to be accepted as normal.
It is similar to the word "get" which in almost all cases is not necessary.
1
vote

It's a rather complex usage and you almost have to address specific contexts and not generalized usages. For example, read this reply to a question on another forum:

  • In AmE, the forms of get are get/got/gotten
    • In BE, the forms of get are get/got/got

However, in the sentence "I've got to go" you are using have got to idiomatically and it basically means the same thing as must or have to. With this meaning, the word got does not change.

He has got to study harder. (He must study harder/He has to study harder) I have got to leave now, otherwise I'll be late. (I must leave now/I have to leave now)

Notice that there is a difference between American English and British English and contexts such as using "have got to" for tener que would be different that those concerning possession (I've got a cold or I've got three apples).

updated FEB 13, 2010
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

holy cow

what now brown cow?

updated FEB 14, 2010
edited by 00769608
posted by 00769608
Gus, are you doing experiments in my thread?.
0
votes

Ian, I found your answer very complete. In fact, I was making a little mistake with "I've" (without "got"). It has been a luck to have all the conjugations of the two verbs.

Anyway, I need confirmation about the two sentences that I said before. I mean, it is not clear for me if "I have got maths before break" can be possible too. From my point of view "have got" only can be used for possesion. Then, if we can say "have got" in this example, then it is possible to use "have got" when it is not for possesion too. Is that as I am saying?. And "I have got brown hair" is not a case of possesion. I see it more like a description. What do you think?

updated FEB 13, 2010
edited by nila45
posted by nila45
NIla - you can say it - and we do - think of the math lesson as your possesion.
Ok, Ian, if you say that I will have to believe you.