Me parece a mi que cosas tan importantes

0
votes

Me parece a mi que cosas tan importantes, y que no se habian nunca oido ni visto antes, deben ser conocidas por muchos y no quedar olvidadas.

The tricky part is in italics (and the usage of 'tan'). I understand what it means, but am having trouble with the negative words (no nunca) and what I believe to be the passive voice... Heres my attempt, can anyone confirm if Im on the right track?

It seems to me that things so important, and not those that one had never heard or seen before, should be known by many and not remain forgotten.

3496 views
updated ENE 26, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by wallpaper
a meaningful title please
Perdon!

5 Answers

1
vote

My take, possibly completely wrong: It seems to me that very important things, and (especially) those never heard nor seen before, should be known by many people, and not remain forgotten.

updated ENE 26, 2010
posted by jeezzle
good answer
0
votes

AHHH! It makes sense now...

Me parece a mi que cosas tan importantes, y que no se habian nunca oido ni visto antes, deben ser conocidas por muchos y no quedar olvidadas.

It seems to me that such important things, and those that had not ever (never) before been heard or seen, must be known by many and not forgotten.

The "no... nunca" translates as "not... ever"... I couldnt figure out how to account for the missing "no" in the other correct explanations.

I suppose now Im just thinking out loud.... oops...

updated ENE 26, 2010
edited by wallpaper
posted by wallpaper
Thanks so much for the help everyone!
0
votes

I think "quedar olvidado" in this case would mean "be (or become) forgotten", as hyrumt says. Similar to "quedar ciego", which means to become blind, not to stay blind.

updated ENE 26, 2010
posted by kattya
0
votes

I find merit in each of these answers, but why the "no" that precedes everything?

Is the author talking about including important things that had never before been seen or heard,

or is he EXCLUDING things that had never been seen or heard...?!?!

updated ENE 26, 2010
posted by wallpaper
Spanish uses "no" to mean both "no" and "not". In this case, it means "not", as in "things which have NOT been seen"
0
votes

The part in italics would be: which have never before been heard nor seen.

It seems to me that such important things, which have never before been heard nor seen, should be known to many and not be forgotten.

updated ENE 26, 2010
posted by hyrumt