HomeQ&A"un servidor" or "servidor"

"un servidor" or "servidor"

0
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i work in a call center dealing with spanish speaking customers. when i call and ask for the customer by name and that particular customer answers he/she always verifys by saying "un servidor" or "una servidora" ... what are they actually saying ?

9569 views
updated OCT 11, 2012
edited by racyne
posted by racyne

7 Answers

1
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RAcyne, this was one of the most difficult words to translate in one of my difficult threads.

Servidor or servidora, means: the one who is talking

In English something like: yes, it is me.

Remember, please, this is a learning site, we need you to use correct spelling and capitalization, thanks;

Welcome to the forumgrin

updated ENE 22, 2010
posted by 00494d19
A common telephone response in English would be "Speaking". Could that be a possible translation? - 0074b507, ENE 21, 2010
that is actually the best translation, good one, quen - 00494d19, ENE 21, 2010
2
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Hello,

If I understand your question correctly, they probably mean "how can I help you?". It is a polite way and means something like "at your service".

updated OCT 12, 2012
posted by LuisaGomezBartle
This is the most accurate answer. - Leafshadow231, OCT 11, 2012
0
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A common telephone response in English would be "Speaking". Could that be a possible translation? - qfreed

this would be perfect in this context.

In the text I mentioned before, the servidora was a word used by a reporter:

Servidora ha tomado unas vacaciones.

here it was best translated as : Your humble reporter/this reporter....

updated OCT 11, 2012
posted by 00494d19
The correct way to say is: (Esta servidora estará de vacaiones) This servant will be on vacation. Servant is a form to call oneself, mean that this person is able to help. - Leafshadow231, OCT 11, 2012
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It's similar to the phrase "at your service" in English.

updated OCT 11, 2012
posted by pmicocci
0
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It's similar to saying "at your service" in English.

updated OCT 11, 2012
posted by pmicocci
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It is a polite answer: literally it means your servant it tryies to refer that they are ready to attend you and help you... so will be at your service ready to help you as you want..

vote me hans

updated ENE 21, 2010
posted by hansitobonito
0
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I don't know anything about the context that you are discussing, but just to mention it, "su servidor", "a su servicio", "a sus ordenes", et. al., used to be common saludos/despedidas (greetings/farewells) in letters.

Literally servidor means servant (Su servidor=Your servant) or as a despedida (yours truly).

Nowadays, it probably means computer server, but I have no idea how it could be used in your context.

updated ENE 21, 2010
posted by 0074b507
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