HomeQ&ADo you use SER OR ESTAR when saying "I'm Pregnant"''''''''?

Do you use SER OR ESTAR when saying "I'm Pregnant"''''''''?

1
vote

Hi! I was wondering if you say estoy embarazada or soy embarazada when saying "i am pregnant" in spanish? thanks for your help!

Rebecca

36229 views
updated ENE 27, 2012
posted by rebecca7

35 Answers

3
votes

Rebecca, speaking as someone who has tried to say ''I am embarrassed'' and ending up saying; ''I am pregnant'' I feel particularly well qualified to make the distinction hahaha lol raspberry tongue wink tongue rolleye LOL grin

A girl/woman would say: Estoy embarazada = I am pregnant

By the way, to say I am embarrassed you could say;: ''Tengo vergüenza'' o Estoy avergonzado. If you mix them up like I did you could well end up feeling even more embarrassed..especially as a man but have a good laugh at teh same time!!! red face confused tongue rolleye LOL grin

updated ENE 26, 2012
edited by FELIZ77
posted by FELIZ77
3
votes

Estar is used for temporary conditions. Use Estoy.

updated ENE 26, 2012
posted by Cherry
2
votes

Rebecca,
Thank heavens it's a temporary condition,

updated ENE 27, 2012
posted by motley
Lol hahahaha Yes, but think of the pleasure of the child you are about to have /enjoy :) - FELIZ77, ENE 27, 2012
1
vote

Hello Rebecca,

I am not sure when you posted this question, but nonetheless, you would say "estoy embarazada". The word "I am" can be tricky in Spanish. I am a woman and I am pregnant. Yo soy una mujer y estoy embarazada. Soy embarazada for some reason just doesn' t go with the tense and meaning/purpose of the word pregnant.

Hope this helps you

updated ENE 27, 2012
posted by A---B---
1
vote

This post is so old, I think the woman would have had the baby by now, so would you now say "ella estaba embarazada".

updated ENE 27, 2012
posted by Eddy
rofl - territurtle, ENE 27, 2012
1
vote

I don't.Just because it's old doesn't mean it has lost it's relevance,refering to the post here.

updated ENE 27, 2012
posted by john
1
vote

You say "estar muerto" because before you have been alive. The second one is condition to the first one

updated ENE 27, 2012
posted by Dunia
1
vote

This is not true. You say: "soy ciego" to mean permanently blind and "soy sordo". If you say "estoy sordo" means that the condition is temporay.

updated ENE 27, 2012
posted by Dunia
0
votes

estar

updated ENE 26, 2012
posted by Rey_Mysterio
0
votes

I'm sure this is a dead forum but... You use estar with muerto for reasons having absolutely nothing to do with the traditional ser vs. estar rules, or even with belief in the afterlife. Muerto is a past participle. The past participle can be an adjective ONLY with estar. With ser, it becomes the passive. Clearly we don't mean to relate that "she is died," but rather that "she is dead." Confusingly enough, Spanish doesn't distinguish between adjectival and verbal participles (although English hardly does).

updated ENE 26, 2012
posted by ledzeppelinfan
0
votes

In Ireland,he/she/it is great crack is a common phrase,There was great crack in the pub last night,meaning;there was a lot of fun and good atmosphere in the pib last night.He's great crack;he funny,entertaining,That now is how it's said by Englishspeakers here In Gaeilge the phrase is,ta craic mhaith ann.I was sure the word was of Gaelic origin,but it seems quite a few languages has the word in it,Mind you I have never come across the word crack used by an English writer to convey the meaning ,to be fun or entertainimg.

updated MAY 13, 2008
posted by john
0
votes

¡Precisamente!

updated MAY 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

So . . . "Tengo unas amigas muy amables"'

updated MAY 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Interesting! I wonder if that comes from a fairly archaic English meaning of crack, which is still used in the phrase "to be a crack shot," which means someone has very accurate aim with a gun.

updated MAY 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Natasha,
First of all, kudos for using the personal A! It's a hard thing for English speakers to remember to do. However, the verb tener is an exception to the rule, and does not take the personal A. Therefore you would say "Tengo un niño."

Don't you hate exceptions? At least Spanish has far fewer than English does.

updated MAY 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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