HomeQ&ARoller Coaster of Love ¿Montaña rusa... de amor?

Roller Coaster of Love ¿Montaña rusa... de amor?

2
votes

I learned a new phrase the other day. I was driving our car filled with people on one of the many country roads in this part of Kentucky. The road went straight ahead, but went up and down for as far ahead as we could see. It really looked like a roller coaster! On one of the 'down' sections one of the guys threw his arms up and yelled "¡Montaña rusa!"

Now, by context I knew that he was saying 'Roller coaster!', but I had to have him repeat it several times to figure out that the words were literally Russian mountain. LOL Russian Mountain? Where did that come from???

So of course, this immediately powered up my mental jukebox and threw on that 70's disco classic! So I started singing out:

¡Montaña rusa! ... de amor... ¡Montaña rusa! Oooh, oooh, ooh!

Their response? long face

Either no one knew the song, or it doesn't work like that in Spanish. grin (or maybe my 'singing' put the blank looks on their faces...)

But it made me wonder, Does that song have Spanish lyrics to it? Would they say 'Montaña rusa, de amor'?

And also, can 'Montaña rusa' be used metaphorically in a way similar to English?

3149 views
updated DIC 18, 2009
edited by chaparrito
posted by chaparrito

3 Answers

0
votes

esto es muy antiguo?

¿Antiguo?

¿Cuál? ¿La canción? ¿Yo? wink Which? The song? or Me?

So, can 'Montaña Rusa' be used as in:

"It was a roller coaster of a day..."? question

updated DIC 18, 2009
posted by chaparrito
0
votes

If you do a Google search for "Montaña rusa de amor" in quotes, you'll see lots of examples with it, so I'm guessing that you can in fact use it as "roller coaster of love".

updated DIC 17, 2009
edited by Luciente
posted by Luciente
0
votes

Pues no sé....esto es muy antiguo?

He visto esto.

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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