HomeQ&A"Pimientos morrones enteros" are brown? Really?

"Pimientos morrones enteros" are brown? Really?

2
votes

They are, according to 3 translators when I entered the phrase.

But I opened a small can of pimientos morrones enteros this morning to discover they are rojos brillantes. (Calidad excelente, a propósito.)

No surprise there, really, because the can has a beautiful photo of these bright red, sweet peppers.

Does morrones have a different meaning here?

Are sweet red peppers known as morrones?

?Puede ayudarme a solucionar este misteria?

5920 views
updated DIC 19, 2009
edited by 0057ed01
posted by 0057ed01
Sorry for the interruption. Was busy editing spaces out... - 0057ed01, DIC 17, 2009
the end gave me such a good laugh, I am sending it to Issa who is feeling low... - 00494d19, DIC 18, 2009

12 Answers

1
vote

alt text Volpon:

Una respuesta muy interesante. Miré en nuestro diccionario y encontré esto ----> Pimiento morrón. An interesting question. I looked in our dictionary and found this ----> Morrón.

Mejor Recuerdos/Best Regards.

Moe

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by Moe
2
votes

Volpon, the word is morrón not marrón, which is brown.

updated DIC 18, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Actually, I think that the word is 'moron' which I believe, with my 'speculation', that I have proven beyond a shadow of a doubt that sí yo soy. - Izanoni1, DIC 17, 2009
Yo, también, soy a moron. Or, (take your pick) el idiota, un imbecil. Or described as bobo o tonto. (Gotta love those last two words!) - 0057ed01, DIC 18, 2009
1
vote

alt text

updated DIC 18, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Jejeje, I missed quite an amusing discussion... and I guess that I'd be standing among the others in the dunce corner anywa wink (at least it's warm there!)

updated DIC 19, 2009
posted by Issabela
0
votes

While I'm at it, is there a Special Award for posting the dumbest question - ever?

I'm the prime candidate, that's for sure!

updated DIC 18, 2009
posted by 0057ed01
jejejejejeje, :rolling and holding my tummy::::: - 00494d19, DIC 18, 2009
0
votes

I'm off to the dunce corner, too!

I can't believe I kept misspelling that delicious vegetable! And even worse to confuse the word with marrón.

Maybe I should hand-write morrón a thousand times while I'm there?

Thanks for the correction, Heidit.

The photos were beautiful, Izanoni.

The answers have been pleasant and amusing to read, too.

updated DIC 18, 2009
posted by 0057ed01
jejejje, genial - 00494d19, DIC 18, 2009
0
votes

morrón. 1. m. pimiento que se diferencia en ser más grueso que el de las otras variedades y es el más dulce de todos.

not ma but mo

¡Ay de mí! ¡Qué tonto soy yo! Gracias Heidita, tarde o temprano tenía que suceder (I don't know what I was thinking trying to juggle four languages at once). Como te estaba diciendo: Otra vez, mi torpeza con la idioma ha triunfado sobre mí. Un burro soy yo. Ya me voy al rincón...

Pues...¿Dónde está mi capirote?

...Ah...plop...Gracias maestra...

alt text

updated DIC 18, 2009
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
jejejejejej :::rolling::: - 00494d19, DIC 18, 2009
0
votes

Cool, though, how this has turned into a spelling lesson!

I can (almost) guarantee I'll never confuse morrón with marrón again.

But I swear that I have seen un morrón márron.

updated DIC 18, 2009
posted by 0057ed01
I'm glad I got my answer in early before the confusion started. Now I can giggle at the gaggle of guys who volunteered themselves to the dunce corner. - Moe, DIC 18, 2009
0
votes

Hi Volpon,

Where I am from, what they call pimientos morrones in Spanish would be called "bell peppers" or "sweet peppers" (in contrast to chile peppers) in English. Moreover, I don't think that the word "morrón" is as much in reference to the color as it is to the shape.

In "Pequeño Larousse Ilustrado" the word "morrón" is defined as follows: Dícese del pimiento de punta roma. In this description, it refers to the blunt shape of the pepper rather than to the actual color.

In the "RAE" the fruit, "pimiento morrón," is defined this way: Variedad que se diferencia en ser más gruesa y dulce. This definition also describes the variety in terms of its shape (as well as its sweeter flavor), in reference to its stouter/thicker appearance.

On the Wikipedia page for "[Morrón][1]" their are several varieties of pepper of varying color that all share the characteristic bell pepper shape.

You might also take note of this excerpt from the page on [capsicum][2] that refers to the flavor of the pepper as well: En el Río de la Plata se denomina morrón a las variedades no picantes.

I think that the word probably is probably related more to the word morro than to the word marrón. And I'll leave it at that.

I have deleted my speculation on my way to the dunce corner

updated DIC 17, 2009
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
0
votes

Volpon, the word is morrón not marrón, which is brown.

Everyone seems to be all over this but go back to Heidita's answer. You're all spelling it 2 different ways.

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by Yeser007
Nice photos by the way! Izanoni's makes me want to bite into one right now. - Yeser007, DIC 17, 2009
0
votes

Izan, this is what the RAE says:

~ morrón. 1. m. pimiento que se diferencia en ser más grueso que el de las otras variedades y es el más dulce de todos.

not ma but mowink

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Best regards to you, too, Moe.

Gracias, para su respuesta.

It is interesting that a sweet red pepper is commonly called morrón, which means brown.

Maybe the sweet red pepper has a brown tinge to it?

Come to think of it, I've seen sweet, brown peppers in southern Mexico.

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by 0057ed01
No me gusta pimientos de cualquier color. Prefiero una dieta sosa. - Moe, DIC 17, 2009
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