HomeQ&Avolverse/ponerse + adjetivo

volverse/ponerse + adjetivo

3
votes

I've just watched the Learn Spanish lesson 3.14 and I have some doubts regarding one of the examples:

El jefe se pone furioso con algunos empleados.

It was explained that we use "ponerse + adjetivo" with emotions and temporary conditions, whereas "volverse + adjetivo" with sudden or very strong emotions. I would expect "furioso" to be rather a strong adjective of emotion. And since in this sentence:

Durante el verano, los niños se vuelven antipáticos.

the verb meaning "to become" that was used with "antipáticos" was "volverse", then would it be correct to use it also with "furioso"?

El jefe se vuelve furioso con algunos empleados.

11253 views
updated NOV 24, 2010
edited by Issabela
posted by Issabela
I think that PONERSE has more to do with emotional states that you can see in a facial expression, like in English we "put on a happy face". VOLVERSE seems to refer more to behavior as in volverse loco - to go crazy or volverse antipƔtico - to get nasty - tonylouis, NOV 24, 2010

5 Answers

3
votes

I can't explain the reason, but "volverse furioso" sounds very odd. I wouldn't use that expression.

These are the cases where I miss Lazarus. He always had the technical explanation.

updated NOV 24, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
Where is Lazarus? - margaretbl, NOV 24, 2010
0
votes
updated NOV 24, 2010
posted by lorenzo9
0
votes

I think that PONERSE has more to do with emotional states that you can see in a facial expression, just as in English we "PUT ON a happy face." VOLVERSE seems to refer more to overall behavioral reactions as in volverse loco - to go crazy or volverse antipático - to get nasty.

If my theory is correct, you would use PONERSE to refer to rapid changes in appearance, especially facial expression, that reflect an altered emotional state and VOLVERSE to refer to changes in overall behavior, whichever is more predominant in the picture.

Examples:

PONERSE contento, de mal humor, furioso, molesto, nervioso, triste, - you can judge all these emotional states from the person's face

BUT

VOLVERSE loco, antipático, alérgico, huraño - you can judge these changes based on an overview of the person's behavior - are they acting crazy, nasty, shy, or having an allergic reaction?

Let me know if you think this is a valid distinction.

updated NOV 24, 2010
posted by tonylouis
0
votes

I see. So in case of these questionable adjectives, it's just a matter of collocations? Has anyone ever seen a list of such adjectives and typical collocations? I know that there are entries in dictionaries, but I'd like to limit the answers to these three verbs: hacerse, volverse, ponerse.

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by Issabela
What is "collocatipn" - the position of "se" before or after the verb? - LaBurra, DIC 17, 2009
No, it's the way how words join to make meaningful phrases. - Issabela, DIC 17, 2009
0
votes

In many cases, "se" can go before or after the verb. The main thing is that it be used. You're right; it's a matter of collocation. Sorry, I don't know of a handy list. This is one of those times where being immersed in the language is the best way.

updated DIC 17, 2009
posted by 005faa61
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