"fresquito"

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In Spanish Dict Dictionary it is showing that fresquito means cool, fresh air, but in the translation it is showing that fresquito means chilly? What is the exact meaning? I got it from the line, ' me bebía ahora mismo un zumo bien fresquito'. I would also like to know the exact meaning of this line.

9649 views
updated DIC 14, 2009
edited by 00494d19
posted by Sushanta_siempre

10 Answers

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Interesting discussiongrin

However, you all got the meaning of the verb form wrong, sorry, this is an unusual use of this tense:

me bebía ahora mismo un zumo bien fresquito'

I would (love to ) drink a really chilled (cold) juice right now.

We sometimes use the imperfect to indicate a future action. Yes, I know, very confusing.

Aloshek, you supposed it was past simple, could not be as this would have been:

me bebí....

updated DIC 14, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Awe, man! Does that mean you're sending me to the dunce corner???
It's really getting crowded in here. Scoot over, please.
Thanks a ton Heidita. That was of great help. Alokesh's answer was seeming totally correct untill your post. ;) Thanks once again.
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Me bebía ahora is correct. Your sentence could translate any of the following ways:

I just drank some rather chilly juice right now.

I just drank some well chilled juice right now.

I just drank right now, some well chilled juice.

Just now, I drank some well chilled juice

"Some" is not a literal translation, but in English we we often say some juice instead of a juice. If you prefer a more literal translation, replace some with a.

updated DIC 14, 2009
edited by aloshek
posted by aloshek
0
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I'm not sure why it would "me bebía" instead of "bebía" or even "yo bebía" though. As far as I can tell (according to our dictionary) beber is not reflexive. I hope someone can come in and explain this that is native.

This is clipped from a thread (by a native) on the uses of pronominal se that was made into a Reference article here.

5) Sometimes a pronoun is used to indicate completeness. Sometimes it is hard to translate these:

Me comí una manzana ? I ate (up) an apple Me bebí la cerveza? I drank (up) the beer. Me fumé el cigarro ? I smoked the cigarette Me leí el libro ? I read (the whole) book

In the examples above, both the apple and the beer were totally consumed. It is very unusual to omit these pronouns (and it sounds a bit strange), but you cannot use them if there is no specific amount to consume:

Me comí arroz (wrong sentence. you cannot use 'me')

updated DIC 14, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
How curious.
Thanks for the clarification. That was of great help too.
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Jeez, I hope you saw my answergrin

updated DIC 13, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Gracias por ayuderme.
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Well Heidita explained it but just so you know I asked the guys at work and they confirmed that "ahora mismo" CAN be used with the past. As in "I drank that right now" even though in this instance it is the future, or maybe they were talking about invoking the future by using the past in which case I would love a more detailed analysis of this phenomenon. As always, I appreciate all your efforts.

updated DIC 13, 2009
posted by jeezzle
What are their credentials of your fellow workers?
Seriously? are me you asking me that?
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maybe they were talking about invoking the future by using the past in which case I would love a more detailed analysis of this phenomenon

Always at your service, Jeezwink

This is the grammar point.

El pretérito imperfecto imaginativo tiene valor de presente y se refiere a hechos imaginados o soñados. Es muy utilizado en el lenguaje popular y en el lenguaje infantil: Yo me comía ahora mil pasteles.

Have a look here.

updated DIC 13, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
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In Mexico, the word fresquito is used to tell someone he is being lazy or shamelles ohh

updated DIC 13, 2009
posted by aLICIA562
Shamelles? She-males?
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More usual:

Me bebería un zumo ......

updated DIC 12, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
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Well "me bebía ahora mismo un zumo bien fresquito" certainly sounds incorrect to me. You might say "Estoy bebiendo un zumo bien fresquito ahora mismo". "I am drinking a well chilled juice right now". I don't see how you could do a past action "right now" especially one in the past imperfect tense, which would indicate that it wasn't necessarily a one time occurance. I would be more inclined to say "Bebí ahora mismo un zumo bien fresquito" but using the preterite but it still seems wrong. "Ahora mismo, bebí un zumo bien fresquito" sounds a bit better I guess... I wonder what the source of this phrase is. Since beber is not reflexive I also cannot see the use Me bebía vs.bebía.

Edit: I am seeing it is getting hits on google though. "Me bebia ahora mismito una vaso gigante" seems to mean "I just drank a giant glass". I'm not sure why it would "me bebía" instead of "bebía" or even "yo bebía" though. As far as I can tell (according to our dictionary) beber is not reflexive. I hope someone can come in and explain this that is native.

updated DIC 12, 2009
edited by jeezzle
posted by jeezzle
Lararus gave us a relexive use for foods meaning "entirely" or ate up (intransitively). In English it might be something like I just drank it all down You might wish to search for it.
Hey jeezle, those were *exactly* my thoughts when I replied! To me, "right now" implies the present or the iminent future.
imminent
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I am a bit puzzled by "me bebía" in the overall context; I would translate that as "I was drinking"

The rest of it is "right now a well chilled juice".

So either it should be "bebo" - "I am drinking ..." or "ahora mismo" doesn't quite follow.

Hopefully someone more experienced than I will reply so we know for sure.

updated DIC 12, 2009
posted by Jespa