HomeQ&APresent Perfect and subjunctive. . .¡tengo una pregunta!

Present Perfect and subjunctive. . .¡tengo una pregunta!

1
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Could you say I've never traveled to Spain using the Present Perfect? Nunca he viajado a España.

Or do you have to use the (confusing!) Subjunctive? (which I don't even know how to conjugate!) ¡Le doy gracias por su ayuda! grin

3548 views
updated DIC 5, 2009
posted by june10

3 Answers

1
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Very interesting question. Usually the question is whether to use the simple past or the present perfect to describe a past action. This indicative/subjunctive viewpont is a new wrinkle.

Let me answer the question first. Yes, it perfectly correct to say: Nunca he visitado a España or No he visitado nunca a España.

It does seem like something that should need the subjunctive. It sounds like you are going to make a declaration about something that doesn't exist or has never happened so how can you declare anything concerning it?

The subjunctive, however, is used to make statements concerning things that are contrary-to-fact. The present perfect tense is used to make statements about past things that are still hold true in the present.

However, wait for a native's input. I'm still arguing in my mind that "no creo que" only invokes the subjunctive when expressing doubt, not when declaring one's opinion or belief, but no one on this forum seems to agree with me. (Of course, that just makes them all wrong, not me grin )

Pues, esa es mi opinión y no tengo duda ninguna que es correcto. No creo que es incorrecta. (For everyone else- No creo que sea incorrecta)

My point is: I'm not the best person to ask about subjunctive/indicative usage.

updated DIC 5, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
0
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"Nunca he viajado a España" is correct. It is a present perfect.

You can visit the link with the conjugation.

updated DIC 5, 2009
edited by nila45
posted by nila45
0
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link text

I hope this can be useful. I am sorry not to have anything in English.

updated DIC 5, 2009
posted by nila45
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