HomeQ&A'papa' & 'papá'

'papa' & 'papá'

1
vote

What is the difference (in meaning) between 'papa' & 'papá'? In my understanding the one with the accent means potato and the one without means father.

25229 views
updated DIC 4, 2009
posted by zerolocked

8 Answers

3
votes

yes, el papá is father la papa is potato. Also, el Papa is the pope!

updated DIC 3, 2009
posted by kattya
So what do you call a priest? Padre? - yogamamaof2, DIC 3, 2009
The same reason you called a nun hermana. - 00f2b5a1, DIC 3, 2009
5
votes

Also, el Papa is the pope!

jejeje. LOL This reminded me of a slip of the tongue that I made this week. I was giving a lesson that involved the Gregorian calendar, explaining how the years Before Christ actually go up as you go back in time. This can be bit confusing so I needed to explain that people who actually lived before Christ didn't count the years that way, rather the calender we now use simply wasn't devised yet. However I said:

"El calendario Gregoriano se instituyó por la papa Gregorio en el año 1582. "

The confused looks on their faces clearly showed they didn't understand, or so I thought. (I mean it is an odd concept that the numbers go up rather than down, right?) So I kept at it, trying to make it clear, all the while not realizing I was using 'la papa' this and 'la papa' that. It wasn't until someone spoke up and asked me "¿Qué tiene que ver con eso 'la papa'?" and I heard someone else say it that I realized I had been saying 'potato' all that time.

That made me chuckle, but they still didn't get it until I corrected myself: "...por el papa Gregorio..." Once they realized my mistake and understood what I had been trying to say all that time everyone burst out laughing. I can only imagine that pictures of 'Mr. Potatohead' had been floating through their heads all that time.

red face tongue rolleye cheese

updated DIC 9, 2013
posted by chaparrito
Great story! - --Mariana--, DIC 3, 2009
this is probably one of the best stories I've heard in awhile, gets my vote. jaja - DJ_Huero, DIC 3, 2009
That's probably why the potato in Spain is patata. - BellaMargarita, DIC 3, 2009
2
votes

Serious question: If the Pope was a lady would she be la Papa?

No, she would be "la Papisa"

updated DIC 4, 2009
edited by 00e657d4
posted by 00e657d4
Thank you - I knew there was someone who could give a serious answer to a serious question. - 00f2b5a1, DIC 3, 2009
I hope you know, mortimer, it was just a jibe on my part. ;-) But what would 'Papisa' be in English? Popess? or Popetrix? - chaparrito, DIC 3, 2009
I was joking too! Another serious question: Would you call a male queen "her ladyship"? - 00f2b5a1, DIC 4, 2009
1
vote

yogamamaof, yes a priest is un Padre.

updated DIC 4, 2009
posted by mrseanstanley
0
votes

caza wrote:

In Andalucia they also use "papi"

I've heard that among the Mexicans in my area. But what confuses me is that not only do kids call their dad 'papi' but they call there mom 'papi' and the parents call their children 'papi' too!

Is it like saying 'honey', 'dear' or 'sweetie' when the parents use it?

updated DIC 4, 2009
posted by chaparrito
In Colombia everybody seems to call everybody "Papi". - 00f2b5a1, DIC 4, 2009
0
votes

papa= es un alimento(vegetal) papa'= es padre wink

updated DIC 3, 2009
posted by stgmaa
0
votes

By the way in Spain many children call their father papa, this is considered "uneducated"

updated DIC 3, 2009
posted by 00494d19
In Andalucia they also use "papi" - caza, DIC 3, 2009
0
votes

Serious question: If the Pope was a lady would she be la Papa?

updated DIC 3, 2009
posted by 00f2b5a1
Can we really take you seriously??? ;-) - chaparrito, DIC 3, 2009
There was a lady Pope years ago - fact! - 00f2b5a1, DIC 3, 2009
Pope Joan in the 9th Century. - 00f2b5a1, DIC 3, 2009
Maybe not a fact. Read this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_Joan - 0074b507, DIC 3, 2009
Yes, I saw that and the Spanish version in Wikipedia - really interesting "Papisa Juana". - 00f2b5a1, DIC 3, 2009
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