HomeQ&AShe is said to be very rich

She is said to be very rich

1
vote

She is said to be very rich.

It is said that she is very rich.

I would like to know if both of these sentences are possible. Thank you beforehand.

3009 views
updated DIC 1, 2009
posted by nila45

5 Answers

1
vote

Sí, Nila, son las dos formas de hacer la pasiva en inglés, ambas formas son correctas.

Creo personalmente que la primera forma se usa más, como es normal, es la que menos sentido tiene en español, jejeraspberry

Mira lo que dice hithere, es cierto que es la forma que al menos coloquialmente se usa más, y es la que luego se transforma en lo que pones, en los examenes se piden las dos formas que mencionas arriba.

updated DIC 1, 2009
posted by 00494d19
3
votes

When using conversational English, I would be likely to express the idea in any of the ways below ... depending on various factors.

  • It's said that she's very rich.
  • She is said to be very rich.
  • They say she's very rich. (perfectly acceptable.)
  • People say she's very rich.
  • Folks say she's very rich. (sounds "southern.")
  • Everyone says she's very rich.
  • I've heard she's very rich.
  • I've been hearing that she's very rich.
  • I've heard tell that she's very rich. (sounds old-fashioned)
  • I hear she's very rich.
  • From what I hear, she's very rich.
  • I've heard through the grapevine that she is very rich. (sounds kind of corny)
  • The word on the street is that she's very rich. (sounds kind of corny)
  • The word is that she's very rich.
  • The rumor is she's very rich.
  • She's rumored to be very rich.
  • There's a rumor going around that she's very rich.
  • Rumor has it that she's very rich.
  • It's rumored that she's very rich.
  • I understand her to be very rich.
  • It's my understanding that she's very rich.

In conversation, I'm more likely to say "Folks say she's very rich," but that's very regional. If I was trying not to sound regional, then I'd be likely to say "People say she's very rich."

When I am using formal English -- for instance, when writing a college essay or business letter -- I might use phrases like those below:

  • Many people claim she is extremely wealthy.
  • Often, one hears or reads that she is exceptionally wealthy.
  • Rumors that she has great wealth are commonplace.

The differences between formal English and conversational English are too difficult for me to explain, though.

updated DIC 1, 2009
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
Very good - nobody should be able to argue with that - you've covered everything! - 00f2b5a1, DIC 1, 2009
2
votes

You can also say: "They say she is very rich".

updated DIC 1, 2009
posted by 00f2b5a1
I wouldn't recommend this phrase as whomever it is said to often responds by saying, "who are they." - hithere3387, DIC 1, 2009
and the retort is often is "those who are in a position to know". - 0074b507, DIC 1, 2009
Or just "people say" - Issabela, DIC 1, 2009
People say... (this is the other way). We do not know who they are. - nila45, DIC 1, 2009
There is no problem saying it "They say..." or "People say..." both are completely acceptable in conversational English. - webdunce, DIC 1, 2009
Actually, I don't think I've ever had anyone say "who are they" when it was obvious I had no one in particular in mind. - webdunce, DIC 1, 2009
I agree that this is a good example by Mortimer. - --Mariana--, DIC 1, 2009
1
vote

Yes, both sound very natural.

Studying linking verbs?

updated DIC 1, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
I am over the worst (estoy al otro lado). I am trying to teach. This is only a revision. - nila45, DIC 1, 2009
By the way, what are the linking verbs?. I am going to be obliged to open a new thread if not .... Can you give a short explanation about that?. This is not the first time I heard someone mentioning it. I am curious. - nila45, DIC 1, 2009
I agree with Q that both sentences sound very natural. - --Mariana--, DIC 1, 2009
0
votes

Webdunce, yes, I see. There are a lot of ways of saying the same. All of them sound perfect to me.

updated DIC 1, 2009
posted by nila45
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