HomeQ&Alevanto ( i lift ) me levanto

levanto ( i lift ) me levanto

3
votes

levanto i lift and me levanto i can understand it means i get up as it means i lift myself but in the case of desayuno and me desayuno i dont understand how the logic works. thanks.

6318 views
updated NOV 27, 2009
edited by 00494d19
posted by rocky-arjun
Sometimes logic doesn't work so you need to use rote memorization. That's true of any language, but least of all French which is the most logical of languages. - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009

13 Answers

7
votes

The pronominal use of verbs (used with the reflexive pronoun) does not always mean that the verb is reflexive. The pronoun can be used to show reciprocity, impersonal use, passive voice, to detransitize the meaning, to show abruptness, to express that you did something by accident, and a few other minor uses that we have discussed here in the past. Do not assume that just because you see a reflexive pronoun (also not an i.o. or d.o. object pronoun) that the verb is being used reflexively.

updated NOV 27, 2009
posted by 0074b507
i'm sorry, but can you send me a PM of that in stupid language lol. - DJ_Huero, NOV 27, 2009
3
votes

You must become one with the pronoun...think like it thinks...feel like it feels...see life through its eyes...let it fulfill its destiny. Then you will finally understand. There is no other way, Grasshoppa.

(Also, it helps to memorize the pronomial verb definitions, which are usually listed separately in most Spanish-English dictionaries).

updated NOV 30, 2009
posted by webdunce
2
votes

Just look up the infinitive of the pronomial verb you're puzzling about. In this case, it is "irse." (Pronomial verbs always end with -se.) I just want to point out, however, that I do not personally translate this example as "to go." I think of the translation in more complex terms, such as, "to take a leave," as in "I took my leave." In the case of "comerse," you would not say "to eat oneself," as if it were reflexive (which it is not), but rather "to be eaten up."

updated NOV 30, 2009
posted by Malenor
2
votes

I am sure that Qfreed's explanations must be good. But, I would like to discuss something that I have read.

Some examples of the use of pronoun when they are not with reflexive verbs: yo me voy al campo. It is the same as: yo voy al campo. "Voy" is not a reflexive verb.

I would define a reflexive verb as a verb in which the action falls on the subject that does it. Example: yo me lavo. Who do I wash?.

To start with, "yo me desayuno" = "yo desayuno". But "yo me desayuno" is not a reflexive verb.

Another example: yo me compré un vestido = yo compré un vestido.

Anyway, althought, it is true that some Spanish speakers use that expression "yo me desayuno" also it is true that, from my point of view, it does not sound very good.

updated NOV 30, 2009
posted by nila45
1
vote

Nila, you wouldn't say yo me comí un trozo de pan, comí is first person preterite of the verb comer and means I ate at some time in the past and that past could have been minutes ago days ago or whatever any way the point I am making is that all you need to say is comí un trozo de pan and you would then be saying I ate a piece of bread. And as for the verb ir it has two different forms which are: Ir = to go and Irse = to go away.

updated NOV 30, 2009
posted by kenwilliams
Sorry, what a mess!. I would like to help you, but how?. What you say, it does not make any sense to me. - nila45, NOV 27, 2009
With respect I don't think I need help everything I have said in this post is correct. - kenwilliams, NOV 27, 2009
1
vote

Samdie, actually, it is the same as "Spanish is spoken by the people who work in this store". It is similar to "the people who work in this store speak Spanish".

Spanish is spoken = se habla español

Although you do not say "here", this is the word that woud miss to express the complete idea. But we never say "aquí se habla español" but "se habla español". The expression is correct.

updated NOV 30, 2009
posted by nila45
1
vote

Here is an excellent list of pronominal verbs.

updated NOV 30, 2009
posted by Malenor
1
vote

I must admit to a certain irritation to see nowadays the inaccurate expression "Hablamos Español" used under the same circumstances.

Assuming that two, or more, or the store's employees do, in fact, speak Spanish, what is inaccurate about their saying "We speak Spanish"?

If anything, I'd be more inclined to quibble with "Se habla español" (on the grounds of being unclear). I can imagine someone going into a store that had a sign with this formulation and asking "I know that Spanish (like all other living languages) is spoken but do you speak Spanish?"

updated NOV 30, 2009
posted by samdie
Because, like I said, it is an anglicization of Spanish, which I take to be a corruption of the language in this context (even if it is technically correct speech). - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
I've been seeing "se habla español" all my life, but the signage "hablamos español" is a much more recent phenemenon in my experience. - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
It is very commonly known that the words on the sign means Spanish is spoken *here*, which is why I also translate it as "Spanish speaking." - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
Where "speaking" serves as an adjectival participle with the noun being understood ("this is a Spanish-speaking establishment"). - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
1
vote

." In the case of "comerse," you would not say "to eat oneself," as if it were reflexive (which it is not), but rather "to be eaten up."

Well, "to be eaten". That has been new for me. I have just learnt something new. Thank you.

By the way, is it correct to say "I lift myself"?. Is it the same as "I get up"?

I mean, I always say: I get up in the morning. I use "get up" to say that I have just got up from the bed.

updated NOV 30, 2009
edited by nila45
posted by nila45
I believe that "I get up" is translated as "me levanto" (lit., I lift myself up). This is pronomial, but specifically reflexive. - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
It is a quick rule of thumb to translate the Spanish pronominal as a "to be" verb in English, but there is also a great danger of being wrong on that. - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
That's why it is simply necessary to memorize these verbs where the subjective logic of it only comes to awareness through much usage of the form. - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
I should have given the rule of thumb as "to be" followed by an intransitive verb, which is a verb that takes no object. - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
1
vote

Another good example of the pronomial which is commonly seen is "hablarse," which does not mean "to speak oneself" but "to be spoken." And so you will often see signs around town that say "Se Habla Español," loosely translated as "Spanish is spoken (here)" or more simply as "Spanish speaking." I must admit to a certain irritation to see nowadays the inaccurate expression "Hablamos Español" used under the same circumstances.

updated NOV 30, 2009
posted by Malenor
Are you sure that it wasn't "Hablemos español." Let's speak Spanish. - 0074b507, NOV 27, 2009
I'm sure. I just chalk it up to the anglicizing of the Spanish language in the US, a topic that was discussed here earlier this year. - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
1
vote

link text Here is a link. There is a different opinion about that.

updated NOV 30, 2009
edited by nila45
posted by nila45
1
vote

I disagree with you. "Irse" cannot be a reflexive verb. Although you use a pronoun with a verb that doesn't mean that this verb becomes a reflexive verb.

"Comerse" is not a reflexive verb. Yo me comí un trozo de pan = yo comí un trozo de pan.

The action of eating falls on the piece of bread not on you.

updated NOV 30, 2009
edited by nila45
posted by nila45
All verbs that have "se" tagged on th end of them are reflexive, - kenwilliams, NOV 27, 2009
1
vote

"Voy" is not a reflexive verb. Yes you are right there, voy is not a reflexive verb it is a congugation of the verb Ir but if you prefix it with "me" as in me voy then you are using the verb Irse which is reflexive. And as for yo me desayuno that sounds like you are eating yourself for breakfast, desayunar is not a reflexive verb so you sat desayuno + whatever it is that you normally have e.g. normalmente desayuno con yogur, galletas y un té pero ayer desayuné con huevos y bacon.

updated NOV 30, 2009
edited by kenwilliams
posted by kenwilliams
Saying "me desayuno" to the Mexicans where I live would net you some good laughs, perhaps a few snickers, and no doubt quite a few puzzled expressions. - Malenor, NOV 27, 2009
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.