HomeQ&AWhat verb is Hay from?

What verb is Hay from?

2
votes

It says in my Spanish book that 'hay' means there is or there are. I heard someone mention this was derived from haber, but I don't see it on the conjugation charts. Putting hay into the conjugation search box yields nothing. Where does the word come from?

32697 views
updated NOV 23, 2009
posted by idahorsegirl

8 Answers

3
votes

Hi. This is answer.

"Haber" es el más importante de los verbos utilizados como auxiliar de los demás verbos. Inclusive de si mismo. "ha habido/había habido"

Forma simple del indicativo tiempo Presente.

(yo) he

(tú) has

(él) ha

(él) hay

(nosotros) hemos

(vosotros) habéis

(ellos) han

Sin enbargo debo aclarar que: Uno de los usos más importantes del verbo haber —y con el que suelen cometerse muchos errores— es en función de impersonal

En este uso, el verbo tiene sólo una persona, hay en presente, hubo en pasado, y habrá en futuro. Por lo tanto, debemos aclarar que el sustantivo que acompaña cada una de estas formas no es sujeto, sino su complemento.

Ejemplos: hay una persona / hay muchas personas y no han muchas personas.

hubo una reacción / hubo varias reacciones y no hubieron varias reacciones.

habrá algún cambio / habrá algunos cambios y no habrán algunos cambios.

Espero haberte ayudado.

updated NOV 23, 2009
posted by EdiOswaldo
Agradesco a belcart.com por su ayuda en su explicación - EdiOswaldo, NOV 21, 2009
3
votes

Haber. Type "haber" into the translator box above and then click on it in the Spanish part of the pull down menu. If you read all the definitions and forms with sample sentences in the entry, I think it will help. Sometimes I have trouble too finding the best way of getting the information - there is so much here and so many ways to use the site.

updated NOV 22, 2009
posted by kittybrougham
I saw that, but I'd like more information. - idahorsegirl, NOV 21, 2009
2
votes

Hay que hacer un esfuerzo por superarse. --- An effort has to be made to get ahead.

Tenemos que hacer un esfuerzo por superarnos. --- We have to make an effort to get ahead.

Hay: is the presnt indicative.

Habrá: is the future tense.

Había: is the imperfect tense

Ha habido: is the preterite tense

I'm sorry I don't know how to explain this too well.

updated NOV 28, 2009
edited by 0068e2f4
posted by 0068e2f4
2
votes

Hay is an impersonal form from the verb haber Present indicative, 3rd person of the singular.

Hay niños en el mundo que no tienen un hogar. --- There are children in the world without a home.

Tenemos ninos en el mundo que no tienen un hogar. --- We have children in the world without a home.

updated NOV 21, 2009
edited by 0068e2f4
posted by 0068e2f4
1
vote

I just typed in the "haber" entry, just as kittybrougha suggested, and it does seem like a complete list. Maybe you would like more of a narrative explanation? +++++++++

"Haber" is a "two for one" sort of infinitive. First of all, it means "there to be"; in other words, it is the infinitive that "there is/there was" or "there are/there were" and "there will be" come from. For example: "Hay tres chicos en la sala".."There are three boys in the room". But if you want to say "There have to be three boys in the room" you would say "Tiene que haber tres chicos en la sala." Another example: "There were many questions"..."Había muchas preguntas". But if you want to say "There had to be many questions." you would say "Tenía que haber muchas preguntas." +++++++++

The other use for "haber" is that it is the infinitive for the perfect tenses, meaning that if you say "I have talked" or "we had gone" or "she will have written", you use a form of the infinitive "haber" for the "have" or "had" part of those tenses. I am not sure if you have dealt with the perfect tenses in Spanish yet, but when you do, you will run into this infinitive and its forms in that usage.

++++++++++

I am hopeful that this has helped explain the dictionary entry more for you.

updated NOV 21, 2009
posted by mountaingirl123
0
votes

I love it when you ask for something in a farmácia or other tienda and the response is: "No hay."

So sweet and to the point.

(It's always foolish to persist, by asking "¿Está seguro?")

updated NOV 22, 2009
posted by 0057ed01
0
votes

In my dictionary, "hay" is from a farm. I suppose that the verb would be "farmar" or most probably "farmer". This is substantiated by the fact that from a "farmacia" you can buy medicine for "hay" fever.

updated NOV 22, 2009
posted by 00515f39
Very witty. - 0074b507, NOV 22, 2009
0
votes

Yes it is true. Hay is a form of the verb haber

updated NOV 22, 2009
posted by ljubep
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