HomeQ&AWhen we talk about the time, in the past....which form should we use?

When we talk about the time, in the past....which form should we use?

2
votes

I know this is earlier stuff but I can't seem to think of it. Ahora son las cuatro de la tarde....hace treinta minutos "estaba" dos y media...? era, fue, estaba, estuvo...

1794 views
updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by jeezzle

5 Answers

1
vote

alt text Jeezle:

I copied these notes from one of Paralee Whitmires Reference pages. Maybe they are what you are looking for.

The imperfect tense (el imperfecto) is one of the several past tenses in Spanish. It is used mainly to describe past habitual actions or to set the scene in the past.

Uses
In General...

The imperfect can generally translate to be what someone was doing or used to do.It sets the background knowledge or scenery for a story.

-- Telling Time and Dates in the Past
Era las tres de la tarde. (It was three o´clock in the afternoon.)
Era el jueves, el 9 mayo. (It was Thurday, the 19th of May.)

 

You can read over the whole Reference Page here:----> The Imperfect.

I hope this was your question and that I understood it.

Recuerdos/Regards,

Moe

updated NOV 18, 2009
edited by Moe
posted by Moe
thanks. - jeezzle, NOV 18, 2009
1
vote

Marianne is correct: "Era la una", but remember to go plural with "eran" any time you have "las dos" through "las doce".

If you want to say something like "It struck 1:00", you would use the preterite form of "dar"..."Dio la una" or "Dieron las dos", etc.

updated NOV 18, 2009
edited by mountaingirl123
posted by mountaingirl123
thanks. - jeezzle, NOV 18, 2009
1
vote

Use the imperfect "Eran las cuatro..."

updated NOV 18, 2009
edited by --Mariana--
posted by --Mariana--
Oops...I had a typo! - --Mariana--, NOV 18, 2009
1
vote

hace treinta minutos eran las dos y media

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by 0068e2f4
0
votes

Era la una

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by AstroLady
y despues de la una eran las dos, y despues las tres :))) - 0068e2f4, NOV 18, 2009
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