HomeQ&AHow would I say "the day after tomorrow"?

How would I say "the day after tomorrow"?

2
votes

How would i say "the day after tomorrow" in spanish?

30282 views
updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by Bluediamond

8 Answers

2
votes

pasado mañana -> the day after tomorrow

You can find this in the dictionarywink

Moe, no tiene artículo.

Welcome to this site, Jackyl and Bluediamondsmile

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by 00494d19
1
vote

Bluediamond,

Here is a welcome page that ideally all new members should read before posting, including the usual customs and practices at SpanishDict. Just follow this link. There is also a page for learning how to make either question or answer entries in the Forum, which you should also read you can follow this link.

After you've read these, you may still have one or more unanswered questions, and for that you can simply ask/open a new question and ask, ideally following the guidelines in the two links I provided above.

I will provide you with an answer though: 'pasado mañana'

Hope you enjoy this site!!!!

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by zenejero
0
votes

This is interesting. Our dictionary gives "mañana" as masculine noun when used as morning but Collins gives two definitions of "mañana"

Masculine noun when used as the future El mañana es incierto - The future is uncertain.

Feminine noun when used as morning la mañana siguiente - The following morning.

Any input from a native speaker?

Hi Eddy!

When you speak of tomorrow as in the morning you say la mañana: me gusta tomar desayuno en la mañana/por la mañana

Now, when you speak of mañana as in the future, destiny or the word in spanish 'devenir', it is el mañana: el mañana trae consigo sorpresas y cambios

The reason that I know for mañana being feminine is that is comes from Matuta, who was the Roman dawn goddess, and the masculine coming meaning an indefinite/unspecified time in the future coming from another root..... I can ask a friend who's a latin teacher if you want the real director's cut edition!

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by zenejero
0
votes

el día después de mañana (the day after tomorrow). after tomorrow is pasado mañana.

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by adecker
0
votes

This is interesting. Our dictionary gives "mañana" as masculine noun when used as morning but Collins gives two definitions of "mañana"

Masculine noun when used as the future

El mañana es incierto - The future is uncertain.

Feminine noun when used as morning

la mañana siguiente - The following morning.

Any input from a native speaker?

updated NOV 18, 2009
edited by Eddy
posted by Eddy
0
votes

El día des de mañana, yo pensar grin

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by April-Sarah
0
votes

Wouldn't it be: "El día después de mañana" ... ?

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by jackyI
I think so. - Tikkitikki312, NOV 18, 2009
0
votes

alt text Bluediamond:

From the SpanishDict dictionary. (But who knew it was there under the entry for tomorrow.) In any event, look at this link:----> tomorow.

Here you will see that "The day after tomorrow" = "el pasado mañana "

Recuerdos/Regards,

Moe

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by Moe
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