HomeQ&AAustralian accent.

Australian accent.

5
votes

What does an Australian accent sound like to a foreign person. I don't know because I am an aussie!! Anyone that answers, I will put a shrimp on the barbie for you!!!!

11680 views
updated AGO 14, 2010
posted by mike123587
getting my vote, correct category, nice post;) - 00494d19, NOV 16, 2009
that would be a prawn....hey, we don't call them shrimps - Fianna, NOV 16, 2009
ja ja good question :) - Kiwi-Girl, AGO 13, 2010
maybe I should ask the same thing about the Kiwi accent lol - Kiwi-Girl, AGO 13, 2010
Got my vote too great question :) - FELIZ77, AGO 13, 2010

17 Answers

7
votes

When I hear an Australian accent, I picture Crocodile Dundee, koala bears and "Outback Steakhouse"(just a joke for Americans) We actually have a restaurant chain in your honor. LOL But to describe it...? Well the only thing I can say is that people with British accents sound very formal, like someone ready to serve you a "spot of tea". Australians sound a little more rough around the edges, like they are ready to take you on an adventure.

This is really difficult Mike. I now want you to try to describe my Philly/NY accent. wink smile and if you succeed, I will give you a cheese steak!

I appreciate the offer of shrimp, but I am highly allergic and have been told my next bite of shrimp will be my last. shock cool cheese LOL

updated ENE 1, 2011
posted by Nicole-B
Great description. I guess being from Oklahoma I could off some biscuits and gravy and grits. - Seitheach, NOV 15, 2009
I have grits about once a year in South Carolina. I am never exactly sure what to put on them. jeje - Nicole-B, NOV 15, 2009
Butter, salt and pepper. - Seitheach, NOV 15, 2009
or make them sweet, with a big of cane sugar! nom nom nom... you can put caramel on top... nom nom nom - zenejero, NOV 16, 2009
great description! the philly accent is more like the hills in the amish country: round, gentle, and giving you time to see what comes ahead... love that accent, and one of my best friends is from scranton and i lurv his accent! - zenejero, NOV 16, 2009
Cheese grits are also excellent (the cheese is cooked into the grits). - webdunce, NOV 16, 2009
caramel & cane sugar? you MUST be a yankee jejeje - Valerie, NOV 16, 2009
5
votes

Oh, how much do I love the Australian accent!! Very attractive...very interesting. I'm sure that you are not an employee of Geico, but that little Aussie gecko that they have on there probably gets them a lot of business! Or - is he a kiwi and not an aussie?

updated AGO 13, 2010
posted by mountaingirl123
I wonder if Mike even knows what the Geico Gecko is or Outback Steakhouse. He would probably laugh at us. - Nicole-B, NOV 15, 2009
But don't you love that little gecko? He's right up there with the Aflack duck! - mountaingirl123, NOV 15, 2009
4
votes

G'day, mate!

I'll give it a burl...the Aussie accent, to me, sounds like a mouth full of sunshine that washes over a person and makes them feel instantly at home.

Hooroo, Aloshek

updated AGO 14, 2010
posted by aloshek
For that comment. I like you. You are welcome in Aus anytime! - Brooke_g89, NOV 18, 2009
very nice :) - Kiwi-Girl, AGO 14, 2010
4
votes

hey, I live in England (in north yorkshire, very strong accent, it's quite hilarious, if you've ever watched an adaptation of wuthering heights then you'll know what i'm talking about :D) and I wouldn't say that australian sounds like a mixture of Scottish and 'British' ( Britain being of course a culmination or Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland an England), i'm assuming it was meant to say an 'english' accent.

But having Australian relatives and a sister who lives in aberdeen (one of the most strongly accented areas of Scotland) then I'd have to disagree. I'd say that the australian accent just has very 'wide' vowel sounds (like the Yorkshire accent) and it is quite 'adventerous' sounding. Although just a quick warning, no-one in england says 'a spot of tea', and if you try that with anyone in yorkshire then you may just get 'clouted' raspberry. although I must say that i've always wondered what my accent sounds like to other people, I have friends from down south (london area) who say that i sound like I was raised in a barn and others who have to seriously concentrate to understand what i'm saying!!! WOOOOOOHH, SHRIMP!!!!! :D

updated AGO 13, 2010
posted by Becking-Tosh
4
votes

Hey Mike, Or as we say "Yo, how ya doin?" Greetings from Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love. Have a world famous Cheese Steak on us!!!! !

alt text

updated AGO 13, 2010
edited by Nicole-B
posted by Nicole-B
Wow that looks good. I haven't had a cheesesteak in over a year now. :( - Seitheach, NOV 15, 2009
Now I feel bad. Sorry. We'll make sure you get one when you come home. Do you want it "wit" or wit out" (onions)? - Nicole-B, NOV 15, 2009
Wit!!! Of course, and peppers too. - Seitheach, NOV 16, 2009
Thanks nicole. That looks preety niiiiicceeeeeeee!!!! - mike123587, NOV 16, 2009
Sorry I mean "pretty". - mike123587, NOV 16, 2009
"No worries mate." - Nicole-B, NOV 16, 2009
4
votes

As an American Aussies sound a bit like a mixture of British and Scottish. I like the accent better than British though. It is very distinct though and easy to pick out.

updated AGO 13, 2010
edited by Seitheach
posted by Seitheach
I have chucked on a shrimp for you Seitheach. - mike123587, NOV 15, 2009
Gracias. - Seitheach, NOV 15, 2009
3
votes

I love the Australian English accent. It´s my second favorite. I think my favorite is an accent that certain Native American tribes have when they speak English, but unfortunately, I don´t know which tribe. I just know I´ve seen a few TV actors of Native American decent and loved their accent: it´s rhythmic and mellow.

I work customer service for a cellphone company. I get calls from all sorts of people with all sorts of accents and sometimes just very broken English (but that is rare). I pride myself on taking the time to understand them and on doing my best to be understood by them, but I messed up with an Australian fellow once. It went like this...

  • Me: What can I do for you?
  • Him: I´m having trouble with my fine.
  • Me: I´m sorry, sir, you´re having trouble with your...fine?
  • Him: No, not fine! Fine! I´m having trouble with my fine!
  • Me: I´m really sorry, sir. I´m just not getting it.
  • Him: My cellfine! I´m having trouble with my cellfine!

I felt so stupid. Of course he was having trouble with his phone. I work for a cellphone company. But, really, he wasn´t saying "fine" but probably something more like "faw-oon."

He took it well, by the way.

updated ENE 1, 2011
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
That's funny! - Lise-Laroche, AGO 13, 2010
3
votes

G'day mate, dijaavagoodwegend?

And the shrimp on barbie? Better make mine a prawn....

updated AGO 13, 2010
edited by nonombre
posted by nonombre
Hahaha, "shrimp" indeed! - limes, NOV 16, 2009
Yeah mate!! Prettyggood! howboutyou?? I wento to the servo and saw the price of petrol and said to myself, "flamin petrol, to high". - mike123587, NOV 16, 2009
3
votes

Hehehehe.You guys put a big smile on my face. Well Nicole I can only recognise 3 accents from the states. They are:1- the LA accent: por ejemplo 90210. The way they speak is indicative. 2- Southern accent: Sounds like the Hill Billies. 3- The New York Accent,- The Sopranos are a good example. So you would sound like them. ... You would say New York as " New Yaarrk". It a tough sounding American accent!!!!!!! 1 shrimp for you as well!!!

updated AGO 13, 2010
posted by mike123587
Well I'm honored that you are comparing me with the Sopranos. The pretty much do remind me of my husband's family so that's that. jeje - Nicole-B, NOV 15, 2009
To me, the Sopranos sound like people from New Jersey. - samdie, NOV 16, 2009
3
votes

G'dye, Mike:

I 'ave a son livin' in Mermaid Waters, City of Gold Coast, Qld, Australia. 'e's been there about 9 years now and the little 'chip off' is starting to sound like one of yer own. Always nice to connect with one of my sons (chosen) countrymen.

Moe.

updated AGO 13, 2010
posted by Moe
Moe your son lives in a beautiful part of this country - he's a lucky duck! - nonombre, NOV 16, 2009
I used to have 2 houses in Caboolture!!!! - mike123587, NOV 16, 2009
2
votes

I forgot to say that 4annie is an aussie too but you guys might already know this. I found this video in which this lady imitates about 14 different accents. It is quite interesting to listen to. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UgpfSp2t6k&feature=fvw

And with "shrimp", in Australia we actually call them "prawns".

updated SEP 25, 2010
posted by mike123587
2
votes

I always think of Russel Crowe when I think of somebody speaking in "aussie" English. I think it is very clear actually, more so than Scottish or Irish for example.

updated AGO 13, 2010
posted by 00494d19
I must say though, that Rus is losing his Aussie accent and Mel Gibson, totally lost his now!!! - mike123587, NOV 16, 2009
Yeah and wasn't Russell Crowe born in NZ and Mel Gibson was born in the US wasn't he - Fianna, NOV 16, 2009
Yes thats right. When Mel cam to Australia at a young age he had he developed a full aussie accent and Russell developed one as well!! - mike123587, NOV 16, 2009
1
vote

When I think of Austrailians I think of Rolf Harris with his Diddery doo (Did I spell that right? ) Dame Edna Everage, Kangaroos, Koala bears and Fosters lager...and the other one with 4 XXXX's lol .not to mention Crocodile Dundee and Home and Away etc... The Australian accent is very interesing and informal I have found the Aussies very sincere, kind and friendly guys and girls for the most part tongue wink I think of Australians like Paul Hogan The guys like to portray themselves as Tough,(macho) outgoing and adventurous ... pretty much like Nicole described... you therefore almost expect them to take you on a ten mile hike or a Survival trip and that's just to give you an appetite for breakfast hahaha

British people are not all formal and we don't all speak with a posh voice, not that I am typically English anyway - having been born in Peru (but that's another story.. I digress lol)

updated AGO 14, 2010
edited by FELIZ77
posted by FELIZ77
didgeridoo lol :) - Kiwi-Girl, AGO 14, 2010
Thanks Marie Claire :) I once tried blowing one when an Austrailian visitor came to our Primary school yr 2 class (6 and 7 year olds) for an educational visit - FELIZ77, AGO 14, 2010
1
vote

hi your accent i think varies mostly from our british in the vowels. To me it sounds like an 'i' after an 'a' like mate it sounds like maite, its hard to explain but thats the only way i can say it. it sounds lazy but then again it was settled by convicts so thats cool and i guess my accents a little lazy smile i love the accent and id like it but i know it would take a very long time. Once i finish school i plan to move to Australia so its been really cool to talk to an aussie smilesmile i probably havent answered your question very well but its the best i could do (from a school girl) lol grin

updated AGO 13, 2010
posted by jaffa_cake_14
1
vote

The Aussie accent? Well - it's as plain as the b***s on a dog, mate! grin I find the Aussie accent to be immediately friendly and down to earth but I don't like that one with the rising intonation at the end of every sentence (like a question? Y' know?) And I'm afraid I can't tell the difference between Australian and New Zealand accents (sorry!!!)

In fact, put an Aussie and a Brit in the same room and the result always seems to be the same - first an argument about sports , second is good-natured insults (you pommies are soooo bloody pomous and you can't play Rugby or cricket -you Australians just drink lager and have barbies all day) then a mutual friendship and respect...........or maybe I've just met the good ones.

Cheers mate.

updated AGO 13, 2010
posted by patch
just get a kiwi and an aussie to say "six packs of fish and chips please' and you'll see the difference :) - Kiwi-Girl, AGO 13, 2010
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