¿Cómo estás? Estoy bien gracias - mentira!

4
votes

In English, in response to this question we very rarely say "Estoy mal". We have responses like; mustn't grumble - not too bad - I have been worse - could be better - so-so - etc,,,,,

What expressions can you use in Spanish that lie between Mal and Bien?

¿Cómo estás? : La verdad, estoy más o menos Is that acceptable for example?

8676 views
updated NOV 16, 2009
posted by 00515f39

13 Answers

7
votes

Hola FRancissmile

Bueno, se puede decir esto:

No muy bien, la verdad...

voy tirando....

No me puedo quejar....

He estado mejor.....

Pues...¿qué quieres que te diga?...

Pues..¿para qué hablar?.....

En fin, hay muchas fórmulas, espero que no tengas que usar ningunawink

updated NOV 14, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Exactly what I wanted. Thanks.
2
votes

A way to say you are not good, is to say "Quieres que te cuente?" We use this in Argentina and it literally means "do you want me to tell you?", as a way of saying "you don't want to know. It will be a list of bad things." Usually used between friends.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by 00e657d4
2
votes

regular, asi asi, estupendo.

updated NOV 13, 2009
edited by jamesgv0r
posted by jamesgv0r
1
vote

¿Cuál es la frase por "tengo un pie en la tumba"?, la que es como suelo sentir.

updated NOV 16, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
tengo un pie en la tumba? with a foot on the grave? That's when you're really sick or when you refer to someone very sick... as in death-threatening situation, enough to say you're a foot away from your own grave.
Actually it is "to have one foot in the grave" like you're in the process of stepping in. At death's door. It's a common hyperbolie for "I'm feeling miserable".
1
vote

You can also say "más o menos" when meaning "so-so". Extremely used in Southamerica!

updated NOV 16, 2009
posted by zenejero
1
vote

Another response in English is "(I) Can´t complain."

Much like Spanish, I have noticed, at least in this area, that we drop the initial subject when giving responses to questions even though we don't have the verb tense to clarify it.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by aloshek
sorry, webdunce, didn´t see you had that in there already...guess it's time to take a break.
1
vote

In English, there is also fair-to-middlin´ (It ends in a g, but people who use this phrase would never pronounce the g on a word that ends in -ing...at least not in the States)

It means: not too bad, not too great; can´t complain; so-so; etc.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by webdunce
Interesting...I've never heard that one.
Think Southeastern USA, we use it all the time here.
I like it!
We use it up in the north woods, too!
0
votes

"dos, tres" always makes people smile. (Used often in Mexico.)

updated NOV 16, 2009
edited by 0057ed01
posted by 0057ed01
0
votes

Or you could say 'gracias a dios' or 'bien, gracias a dios'

updated NOV 15, 2009
posted by Chavag
0
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Being mindfull that I am not as fit as I used to be and that I am not too bad for my age I normally say bastante bien gracias.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by kenwilliams
0
votes

I think that there are as many books that say to use ,asi-asi for a response to ¿como estás ? as there are native speakers who don''t know what it means. I use mas o menos or regular.

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by adamstebbins
0
votes

Can you say 'así así' for 'so so'?

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by Chavag
yes:)
0
votes

Hóla cómo estás?--------------------------Regular

updated NOV 13, 2009
posted by ray