What´s the difference between conditional and subjunctive?

0
votes

I´m just not getting it. What´s the difference between, for example, diríamos and digamos?

47590 views
updated Nov 6, 2009
edited by lorenzo9
posted by webdunce
e->i
Thank you, lorenzo9.

11 Answers

3
votes

Lesson 3.1, the subjunctive sentence has 3 different requirements.

  1. There must be 2 different subjects each within an independent and dependent clause.
  2. A relative pronoun (que, quien or como) must link the two clauses.
  3. There must be two different verbs, one in the indicative and the other in the subjunctive.

An example of the subjunctive sentence form used in the lesson is "Quiero un hombre quien sea rico," or "I want a man who is rich." This sentence contains 1. two different subjects, 2. a relative pronoun (quien), and 3. two different verbs, one in the indicative and the other in the subjunctive mood.

The subjunctive mood must also express some subjective sense as in emotions, wishes, hopes, or desires.

The conditional mood is the form best translated in English with the word "would," as in "I would like to go to the movies but I have homework tonite," or "Me gustaría ir al cine, pero tengo la tarea esta noche." Notice that there is no relative pronoun in this sentence, and it expresses the conditional in the sense that IF I didn't have homework things would have been different.

updated May 25, 2016
edited by Malenor
posted by Malenor
Unless some hispanohablante comes by and says this is utter nonsense, it's got my vote for best answer.
I should add the "doubting" aspect of the subjunctive mood. But if you really want to know, the lesson is 3.1
2
votes

At the risk of oversimplfying, the conditional is a declaration of what would be done in a hypothetical situation that is unreal or contrary to fact. The subjunctive is used for things you cannot declare, such as an unreal or contrary to fact situation.

updated Nov 5, 2009
edited by lorenzo9
posted by lorenzo9
1
vote

Hi Webdunce,

I think that Lorenzo has nailed it as far as how "would" in the subjunctive is generally used to express a wish or desire:

"Oh (I wish) that someone would get this guy off of me!"

Whereas in the conditional, "would" is often used to express/declare what one would actually do (often in the future).

If this still seems confusing, try having a look at this article on the conditional:

conditional

updated Nov 5, 2009
posted by Izanoni1
1
vote

"Oh that someone would get this guy off of me!"

That is a wish that someone would do something, not a declaration that someone would do something, so it uses the subjunctive.

"If I had been there, I would have tossed the guy out of the room."

would have the past perfect subjunctive in the first clause and the conditional perfect in the second.

updated Nov 5, 2009
posted by lorenzo9
0
votes

Okay, here´s another example...

I want to say "I think it should be blue" as in "I think it is supposed to be blue" (I would say this, for instance, if the instructions said to paint it blue, but you painted it orange).

Should I say:

"Creo que deba ser azul."

"Creo que debería ser azul."

"Creo que sería azul."

"Creo que sea azul."

Or some other way.

updated Nov 6, 2009
posted by webdunce
My first guess is "Creo que deba ser azul." My second guess is "Creo que debería ser azul."
"Creo que debe ser azul." or "Creo que debe haber sido azul."
I thought creo que required subjunctive....auughhh.
0
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You are declaring what you think, so my guess would be

Creo que debería ser azul.

updated Nov 6, 2009
posted by lorenzo9
0
votes

3. There must be two different verbs, one in the indicative and the other in the subjunctive.

One thing though, it doesn´t make sense to say that the subjunctive is required in sentences that contain a subjunctive verb. I think this part needs to be re-written.

updated Nov 5, 2009
edited by lorenzo9
posted by webdunce
I am certain I typed a 3 and not a 1...odd.
It's because your post was autoformatted as if the "3" were the first item in an ordered list. I've found that if you put a parenthesis after the number "1)." you can avoid the autoformatting
Putting a backslash before the period "escapes" it and prevents it from being recognized as a numbered list.
Thanks for the complimentary edit, lorenzo.
Thanks for the tip lorenzo
I hope the example I borrowed from lesson 3.1 clears up the confusion about subjunctive sentences containing a subjunctive verb.
0
votes

I can´t think of any examples. I just know I can never figure out if I should use conditional or subjunctive. Are the two not commonly confused? I would have thought this was a common problem.

These aren´t great examples, but...

You said earlier: ¡Pero que alguien me quite a este tío de encima!

I took this to mean something like "Oh that someone would get this guy off of me!" And you used quite, which is subjunctive.

But, then I have seen "diríamos" for "we would say." But that is conditional.

I think it is the "would" that is messing me up. Both can be translated into English as "would {whatever}."

updated Nov 5, 2009
posted by webdunce
The Spanish subjunctive sometimes translates into English as "would," but not as a rule.
0
votes

There are some questions on the subjunctive answered

here

(but not yours.)

updated Nov 5, 2009
posted by lorenzo9
0
votes

HI wedunce, actually I don't really understand your question.

Why don't you post some sentences where you could not the two ideas clearly?

updated Nov 5, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Hola web, de momento es

diríamos.

wink

updated Nov 5, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Well, I can´t fix it because I have already used up my "maximum edits" for the day...though, to my knowledge, I have edited nothing today...because I keep getting that error.
And it´s not my fault you guys really blew it when decided to make decir´s conjugation all weird like. :-P
jejejejjejej, this would get my vote, will you please say these finny things in posts!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! lol
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