HomeQ&AHow does one say, "dirty words" in Spanish?

How does one say, "dirty words" in Spanish?

1
vote

(With a blush, I suppose...)

But I'm serious. I mean, aren't so-called off-color words among the first we all learn? T'was so for me when I began learning Spanish.

Es "palabras sucias," problemente.

I need to know, because I may have to apologize for innocently using some "dirty" words recently.

Gracias

9707 views
updated FEB 15, 2010
posted by 005457e3
palbrotes. - kenwilliams, OCT 28, 2009

8 Answers

4
votes

dirty word - una palabrota

updated OCT 28, 2009
posted by Issabela
- Deanski, OCT 28, 2009
3
votes

Do not curse to begin with.

updated FEB 15, 2010
posted by dasdasd
It sounds like, for Carlos, it's too late for that. Also, knowing some "palabrotas" may help one recognize when such words are used against them, and know not to repeat them (assuming one does not want to curse to begin with) - jrey0474, OCT 28, 2009
Well, for me personally, I don't feel that I need to know the meaning to recognize an insult, and I'd rather not have them swimming around my subconscious, ready to leak out when I least expect it. :) - Valerie, OCT 28, 2009
2
votes

I have heard " groserias"

updated OCT 29, 2009
posted by JasmineAbdalla
That's another way, but it is "grosería" with an accented -í-. ;-) - chaparrito, OCT 29, 2009
2
votes

I agree with Ken and Issabela that the most common word would be "palabrotas" (decir palabrotas - to swear), but depending on where you are you might also here "tacos" (soltar tacos - to swear); "maldición" (maldecir - to curse at someone; soltar una maldición - to say a curse word); or "garabatos."

"Malas Palabras" may be able to be used in this way, as hjones has suggested (although I have never heard it used as such), but the way that I have always heard/seen "malas palabras" is when describing that someone has used a word incorrectly (malas palabras)

updated OCT 29, 2009
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
1
vote

I apologize for the ambiguity of my question. I didn't phrase it well.

But I've enjoyed and benefited from the responses. Thank you.

Actually it wasn't a "curse" that prompted the question I posted here. I used the word culito in polite company thinking I was being "cute." And sensed immediately I definitely wasn't.

But, at least, I now know to use palabrota when I apologize.

updated FEB 15, 2010
posted by 005457e3
I thought "culito" meant "bum" or "backside" or - let me stop there. - ian-hill, OCT 28, 2009
I wonder how you used that one in polite conversation. It is not a polite word. What were you trying to say? - jeezzle, OCT 29, 2009
Jejeje, Ian! It does mean "bum," but in a more explicit way. And, Jeezzie? Sorry, what I tried to say isn't appropriate to share in this polite forum. Too raunchy! - 005457e3, OCT 29, 2009
What is/is not a "polite" word depends on the the company/society that one is in. It's all very subjective. - samdie, FEB 15, 2010
1
vote

So what is the question? Are u asking how to say dirty words "malas palabras" in spanish, or are you asking for a couple examples of some "malas palabras"? Im not sure if we're allowed to post such word although theoretically (depending on how excited you are about learning them) one tends to learn those words quicker.

updated OCT 28, 2009
posted by hjones
0
votes

dirty words are usually known as malas palabras.

that diminutive word is neither a palabrota nor rude. maybe the context was unappropiate. I use it a lot with many friends and never sensed hostility or disapproval.

updated FEB 15, 2010
edited by mediterrunio
posted by mediterrunio
0
votes

what??? im lost

updated OCT 28, 2009
posted by pinkgurl87
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