HomeQ&AIs señora Ms. or Mrs.?

Is señora Ms. or Mrs.?

1
vote

Is Señora Ms. or Mrs. in English?

22375 views
updated JUL 22, 2010
edited by --Mariana--
posted by 6mia99

10 Answers

2
votes

I call any female over 35 Señorita regardless, it makes them feel young and they like me better for the harmless flirt... smile hehe

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by cheeseisyummy
Un hombre muy galante!! - mountaingirl123, OCT 26, 2009
Okay, you've got my vote! - --Mariana--, OCT 26, 2009
1
vote

Hmmm, I don't know in English, actually I think it is the same.

In schools the teacher is normally called "la señorita" by the children, independent of her being married or not.

Most of the time, in Spain señorita is used for all women working:

Le ha atendido la señorita Silvia.

However: Le ha atendido el Señor Pérez

Very unfairconfused

This is what the dictionary says:

In fact, there are two meanings suitable for this case:

  1. f. Término de cortesía que se aplica a la mujer soltera.
  2. f. Tratamiento de cortesía que se da a maestras de escuela, profesoras, o también a otras muchas mujeres que desempeñan algún servicio, como secretarias, empleadas de la administración o del comercio, etc.
updated JUL 22, 2010
posted by 00494d19
1
vote

"Ms." is a modern invention of Americans wishing to be "politically correct" and to defer to the notion that using a title for a/any woman based on her marital status is a form of discrimination (especially since no such distinction is made for men). It is silly to suppose that (all) other languages would immediately adopt distinct forms of address that would accurately reflect the concerns of American language "reformists".

One might argue that the entire discussion is misdirected and that there should be a single designation for women (regardless of age/marital status) as is the case for men. One might also argue that there should be only one designation that applies to all men/women, irrespective of gender/age/marital status (such as the suffix "san" in Japanese).

As far as I can tell, most of these "reformers" are ignorant of the language and its history/development. They do not care why certain forms of expression exist (nor how they came to exist)., They don't even care about the real meaning of such expressions. Their concern is that they find the expressions offensive (or, better, are offended by their own interpretation of the expressions even if it differs from the traditional interpretation).

updated JUL 22, 2010
posted by samdie
I've never heard anyone get so mad about "Ms." before. - jrey0474, NOV 18, 2009
1
vote

I believe that "señora" is used like "madame" in French, in that it refers to marital status, but after a certain age it is also used to address any woman who is no longer young. For example, you wouldn't call a 40 year old woman a "señorita" regardless of her marital status, at least not in my experience. Usage may vary depending on geographical area.

updated OCT 27, 2009
posted by mountaingirl123
0
votes

Se?ora is Mrs. and Se?orita is Ms.

updated NOV 18, 2009
posted by gmeb98
0
votes

It would be Mrs.

updated OCT 26, 2009
posted by --Mariana--
Is there an equivalent of Ms. in Spanish? - 00515f39, OCT 26, 2009
Good question. I'm not sure Ms. has taken root in the Spanish culture. - --Mariana--, OCT 26, 2009
I hope it hasn't Marianne. - ian-hill, OCT 26, 2009
What could it possibly be "senrita" or something like that? - ian-hill, OCT 26, 2009
0
votes

In English we have Mrs., Mr. and Miss

In Spanish we have señora, señor and señorita.

Now the question to native speakers - for me Mrs and Miss is distinction between marital status while señora and señorita is distinction between age... Am I right?

updated OCT 26, 2009
posted by Behemoth
I think its the same as in english, depending on the context. - cheeseisyummy, OCT 26, 2009
No it is not all the same Cheese - Mrs means the lady is married or was married. Miss means she is not married. Ms is a modern invention. - ian-hill, OCT 26, 2009
0
votes

Senora is Mrs., Senorita is Ms., Senor is Mr. (of course the n have the ~ over them)

updated OCT 26, 2009
posted by dtzl38
Señorita is "Miss" - "Ms" is an unecessary relatively recent invention. - ian-hill, OCT 26, 2009
0
votes

You have Señor, Señora, Señorita, Don and doña

updated OCT 26, 2009
posted by kenwilliams
Upsss - you made me realise those words also exist and as matter of fact I have heard them a lot... ;) - Behemoth, OCT 26, 2009
0
votes

It would be Mrs

updated OCT 26, 2009
posted by sweetellapixie
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.
SOCIAL NETWORKS
APPS