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English as a second language

1
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I have been thinking of volunteering as an ESL tutor during the summer and christmas semester breaks. I'm fluent in English of course, but I'm no English major. Hablo español pero no lo hablo con soltura. ¿Hay alguien aquí que haya enseñado ESL a hispanohablantes? ¿Me darías sugerencias/consejos? I'm not sure where to look or if I need any special certifcations.

2062 views
updated OCT 16, 2009
edited by Nicole-B
posted by 003487d6

9 Answers

2
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Why do we say that I am in my car but on the bus?

Hmm how about... try to stand up, if you bang your head, you're 'in' it grin I guess planes illustrate this quite well, as if you were taking a 747 you'd be "on the plane", but shrink the plane right down til you can't stand up anymore, like a cessna, and you would say that you were in it.

As for 'why', "in" gives the impression you're more enclosed, "on" gives the impression that it's more underneith you than around you. Also covers why someone would be in a magazine (which is folded, encompassing the contents) but on a poster (which is flat).

(I know you wasn't actually asking the question, merely presenting it as an example, but I have work to avoid doing grin )

That was just off the top of my head too, can I be an ESL teacher? grin

updated MAR 2, 2010
posted by AnnoLoki
1
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If it's the thing that gives you fire, then you can do it. All things have prerequisites...but I have confidence in you and your ability. Go for what you know...and you will succeed in it. wink

updated OCT 17, 2009
posted by ChamacoMalo
1
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I do volunteering as an ESL tutor a few nights a week at my local library. It's not as difficult as I thought it would be. We mostly read books, do workbook exercises, and have conversation.

I say give it try and don't be afraid if you don't have the answer to "Why do we say that I am in my car but on the bus?

updated OCT 17, 2009
posted by --Mariana--
On is used for forms of transportation where you can move freely (like a train or bus) or where you are actually riding on it (like a horse or motorcycle.) The only exception seems to be those huge stretch limos with swimming pools that you still ride in. - lorenzo9, OCT 16, 2009
Wow yes I would have had no idea how to answer that question! Thanks haha - 003487d6, OCT 16, 2009
1
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hHi dandi, have you seen Charlies blog? He might know. He is teaching in Spain now.

updated OCT 17, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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I think it depends on the country, some friends of mine have only two years of college and they are able to teach ESL in some countries already. I can't wait to start teaching in a foreign country surprised

updated OCT 17, 2009
posted by sunshinzmommie
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I did that about 10 years ago and at that class I just followed the certified instructor's requests. There were texts we reviewed together for pronunciation, reading and general discussion. It was fairly structured.

updated OCT 17, 2009
posted by nizhoni1
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Thanks a lot everyone; great suggestions!

updated OCT 16, 2009
posted by 003487d6
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About two years ago we started a couple of conversational ESL type class at or Church, what we are finding is that at least here in Oregon the thing our students really need is a chance to build confidence and by being around English speakers they do that, they also have a chance to build relationships in the community they are living in.
I personally have a High School education and no formal training as a teacher and am just starting to try to learn Spanish. What I do have is 53 years of experience with life and am now working with about 60 different families on an ongoing bases and watching the number grow every week. I am having the best time of my life and would encourage anyone to give it a try, stay loose and above all have fun.

updated OCT 16, 2009
posted by designwizard
1
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the TEFL, it's almost always required to teach English. Google it, you can find a ton of info online. grin

updated OCT 15, 2009
posted by redsoxnia
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