Very colloquial: más largo que un día sin pan

2
votes

I remember Nicole posting something about not eating if she has no bread or something...jeje

Well, I don't think I am mistaken if I think that you are getting this one wrong....the meaning is really unusual.

Here we are talking about a person's height. big surprise Yes, rather strange.

Este hombre es más largo que un día sin pan.

A day without bread is unimaginable in Spain, we eat bread with everything...so something longer/taller in this case...is simply impossible to imagine.

5182 views
updated OCT 14, 2009
edited by 00494d19
posted by 00494d19
height

6 Answers

0
votes

We do have another one. That's longer than a month of Sunday's.

updated OCT 14, 2009
posted by Seitheach
omg....lol...that is really funny, so funny I am going to remember that.
0
votes

Here are a couple about the weather. It's hotter than a two dollar pistol shootin' uphill. Or. It's hotter than a burnin' stump.

updated OCT 14, 2009
posted by Seitheach
I've heard some "hotter than a two dollar..." idioms, but there not all that family friendly, so I don't think that I will post them here
0
votes

I've heard, "he's taller than the day is long".

"as the day is long" is an intensifier that is used often to emphasize the adjective used to describe someone/something.

It is often associated with personal emotions/feelings/qualities:

as merry/happy as the day is long

He's as honest as the day is long

as industrious as the day is long

as lazy as the day is long

Shakespeare's much ado about nothing is generally credited with introducing this particular phrase into our lexicon; however, as is true of many assertions such as these, it is likely that a similar phrase probably existed this or was at had at least found some contemporary use prior to being published/acted in his play.

Interestingly enough. In German they say, "dumm wie die Nacht" (as stupid as the night) to describe utter and complete stupidity.

updated OCT 14, 2009
posted by Izanoni1
0
votes

I've heard, "he's taller than the day is long".

updated OCT 14, 2009
posted by Seitheach
really????? Well nothiing ca beat that...jeje, almost the same in Spanish only the bread bit is not in there...
We never talk bad about our bread! I can't believe you do!!! jejejeje
0
votes

Any suggestions as how to formulate a similar sentence in English?

updated OCT 14, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
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I think what it is implying is that if you don't have any bread (or food in general) then the day seems to take forever. So that would mean the man is very tall.

updated OCT 14, 2009
posted by Seitheach
Yes, that's it.