no está en nada

1
vote

I saw a one-for-one translation for "no está en nada", which was "he's out of it". There was no context provided. (It was like a flashcard).

But "he's out of it" can have more than one meaning in English.

examples:

  1. "He's out of it" = he's unconscious, or he's out cold
  2. "He's out of it" = he's out of the running in a race, or competition etc.

My questions are:

Is the translation correct in any one context ? or both ?

I have absolutely no idea !

4514 views
updated OCT 13, 2009
edited by peterpierre2
posted by peterpierre2

2 Answers

0
votes

He is out of work.

updated OCT 13, 2009
edited by 00769608
posted by 00769608
0
votes

If I hear that phrase, to me it means that he's not involved in any bad/weird/suspicious activity. Like he is a good, decent and clean guy. That's in Argentina. It might be different in other countries.

updated OCT 13, 2009
posted by 00e657d4