HomeQ&ADo all Spanish adjectives come after the noun they're modifying?

Do all Spanish adjectives come after the noun they're modifying?

0
votes

Like, la casa verde. Is there a case where it is la verde casa (except another example)?

6342 views
updated OCT 6, 2009
posted by hershey411

4 Answers

1
vote

I would say that in the normal structure (spanish) the correct form is: Noun + Adjective, but in a poetry context (spanish) it´s common the other way, i.e. Adjective + Noun...

Example: From a Pablo Neruda poem

Déjame libres las manos .......

updated OCT 6, 2009
posted by Carlos-F
Agreed. I'm not sure how I talk anymore...I hardly ever notice it anymore. - ChamacoMalo, OCT 6, 2009
0
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There is great answer to your question...

and here you have a bit more.

If you want find more on this site just type "adjectives" in "search" field in "Answers" section... wink

updated OCT 6, 2009
edited by Behemoth
posted by Behemoth
0
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As with numbers, quantifiers typically precede the noun that they modify e.g. tengo mucho trabajo.

There are also a number of adjectives that can either precede or follow the noun but the meaning changes according to the position e.g. "Es un gran hombre." (He's a great man) vs "Es un hombre grande. (He's a big man).

updated OCT 6, 2009
posted by samdie
0
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In general, but not always.

For example:

Crazy Chicken = Pollo loco, and White house = Casa blanca.

It dosen't follow the noun if it is a number.

For example: Eight cats = Ocho gatos

updated OCT 6, 2009
posted by eric_collins
And no, it would never be "Verde casa". - eric_collins, OCT 6, 2009
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