HomeQ&AEl cafe es o esta frio?

El cafe es o esta frio?

1
vote

Uso ser o estar para "el café ____ frío"?

Gracias.

22919 views
updated ENE 2, 2010
posted by bngarren

13 Answers

5
votes

Do not use the temporary / permanent rule!

Does anyone recall this advice from out Ser/Estar Reference article.

I agree that Estar is the correct verb, but not for the temporary state reasons given.

Iced tea might serve as a better example.

If we were distinguishing iced tea from hot tea the we would use Ser as it is a classification. That CID usage for cold coffee does not apply as well. You can buy iced coffee, but no one sells cold coffee.

Cold coffee refers to a state in time. And the length of the time span is unimportant.

Molten metal, liquid metalls, solid metals take Ser as they are classifications of metals and it doesn't depend on whether the metal would change state if the temperature is allowed to alter over time.

So forget the temporary/permanent. Think CID or not.

Classification/identification/definition=CID

updated SEP 20, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
2
votes

Some example of how switching the two changes the meaning-

La manzana está verde.

The apple is green. (condition)

La manzana es verde.

The apple is green. (essence)

What is she like? She is quiet.

Use ser: Ella es callada.

How is she acting? She is being quiet.

Use estar: Ella está callada.


Uses of ser

the hour, day, and date

place of origin

occupation

nationality

religious or political affiliation

the material something is made of

possession

relationship of one person to another

certain impersonal expressions

where an event is taking place

essential qualities


Uses of estar

geographic or physical location

state or condition

many idiomatic expressions

progressive tenses


Ser and estar (contrasting uses)

When a noun follows the verb, use ser

When an adjective follows the verb, decide between "essence" and "condition"

To tell where something is from, use ser

To tell where something is located right now, use estar

To tell where an event is taking place, use ser


updated ENE 2, 2010
posted by NikkiLR
Quite good answer, thank you - pondennis, ENE 2, 2010
if u give examples it will b more understandable - pondennis, ENE 2, 2010
2
votes

Use "estar". Estar is used when something is in a temporary state.

El café está frío.

The coffee being cold is just temporary, it won´t be cold forever.

updated SEP 20, 2009
edited by NikkiLR
posted by NikkiLR
However if the coffee has got cold it is likely to remain that way. If it was an iced coffe to start with would it use the ser verb? Just wondering. - ian-hill, SEP 19, 2009
If it were iced coffee to start with, the comment would be irrelevant. A person would not normally remark that iced coffee was "cold". - colen35, SEP 20, 2009
But of course one would ...(remark that the iced coffee is cold)....! cold and refreshing, for example:-) - Janice, SEP 20, 2009
Hmm... that is a good one. I think that even though it is cold, it is not a permanent thing. What if you are out in the heat? It will eventually get warm. - NikkiLR, SEP 20, 2009
Even in the hottest of places the coffee would never even become tepid again. - ian-hill, SEP 20, 2009
This iced tea is warm the ice has melted. - kenwilliams, SEP 20, 2009
2
votes

I seem to recall my Spanish teacher telling me it depends on what you are trying to say. If you are making a complaint to the water, as in 'this coffee is cold' use es. But, if you are trying to say the coffee got cold over time, as in 'We've been sitting here so long my coffee is cold!' use está. It's all context! Hope this helps.

updated SEP 20, 2009
posted by unraveled
2
votes

Yes, do forget about the permanent condition, please read Lazarus¡s article about ser y estar.

The CID rule: SER is used to classify, identify, and define (CID)

The verb ESTAR is used for situations and states in time and space.

updated SEP 20, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Thank You for the article referral - Tamara-Van-Hook, SEP 20, 2009
1
vote

Absolutely, the answer really lies in weighing out which is most important to the meaning intended. That is one of the cool things about Spanish. It has a certain flexibility that English sometimes lacks. Ser and Estar are just one example. Don't even get me started on Por and Para LOL smile

updated SEP 20, 2009
posted by jonnyt1963
1
vote

Muerte is a specific example of a word that does not appear to follow the permanent/temporary but, the truth is, it does.

I do not want to start a religious debate here by any means, but I was taught years ago that because of the influence of the Catholic church in Spanish speaking countries, death is considered a temporary condition, not a permanent one. So, with this in mind, estar does make sense.

Just my two cents smile

updated SEP 20, 2009
posted by jonnyt1963
1
vote

Do not use the temporary / permanent rule!

But that rule has helped me. Maybe you do not like it, or prefer not to use it, but others do...

I do not use that rule for all cases. I was using it this because we were dealing with drinks/food, and it works well here. Also that rule works well with feelings.

Another thing you cannot use it for is profession. Soy profesora. Using ser goes against the "rules". You may change your profession.

Rules do have faults, in whatever language. It is not a reason to use them.

I before E execpt after C, the two words its and it's,conjugating verbs ect.

So lets just say use estar if its a non permanent thing, except if you are dead or have a profession.

updated SEP 20, 2009
edited by NikkiLR
posted by NikkiLR
1
vote

Hablando gramaticamente, es correcto usar el verbo 'estar' porque como dijo otra persona, el cafe no se va a quedar caliente. Es una condicion temporaria.

updated SEP 19, 2009
posted by jonnyt1963
0
votes

Hace frio en el café.

updated SEP 20, 2009
posted by Goyo
? - --Mariana--, SEP 20, 2009
0
votes

I do not want to start a religious debate here by any means, but I was taught years ago that because of the influence of the Catholic church in Spanish speaking countries, death is considered a temporary condition, not a permanent one. So, with this in mind, estar does make sense.

Just my two cents smile<

Make perfect sense smile

updated SEP 20, 2009
edited by NikkiLR
posted by NikkiLR
0
votes

El cafe este frio El agua este caliente

updated SEP 20, 2009
posted by pondennis
0
votes

I agree with Q here on not thinking about it in terms of temporary or permanent. You say, 'Está muerto' to say he's dead, but according to the temporary/permanent rule, you should use 'ser' instead of 'estar' but nope, you use 'estar' and I'm pretty sure being dead is a pretty permanent condition.

-Charlius-

updated SEP 20, 2009
posted by Charlius
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