if it were up to me, I wouldn't get up until 9:30

1
vote

if it were up to me, I wouldn't get up until 9:30

They use "up to" instead of "for". This is confusing for me.

I cannot understand the meaning of: up to (in this sentence). Can anyone explain it to me? I don't know what "up to" means.

6232 views
updated SEP 9, 2009
edited by nila45
posted by nila45

5 Answers

4
votes

If it were up to me, I wouldn't get up until 9:30

Si fuera por mí me levantaba a las 9.30..

to be up to: esta decisión solo depende de ....

I won't go out tonight.

Well, that's up to you.

No salgo esta noche.

Bueno, tú mismo.

updated SEP 9, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Yes, exactly!
Nice
1
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Hi Nila

If you look at one of your examples "The success of this project is up to us.". In this sense up to means "it is our responsibility. I don't believe any of your three meanings fits this example.

updated SEP 9, 2009
posted by Eddy
1
vote

I'm not sure if it would be considered an idiom or not, but it basically means " if the choice or the decision was mine..."

Hope this helps.

updated SEP 9, 2009
posted by Nicole-B
0
votes

I would translate: él éxito de este proyecto es para nosotros - or él éxito de este proyecto es nuestro. Well, in this example it is more difficult. Of course, I would have to imagine more things. It is clear that if you say "it depends on us" would be better translated.

It is true that on some occasions it is better "it depends on ...". But, I cannot dismiss the other options: hasta, por, para.

updated SEP 9, 2009
posted by nila45
In a great many cases "it depends on him/us/etc" could be replaced by "it is up to him/us/etc."
0
votes

Of course, until now I knew that "up to" meant "hasta" in Spanish. That is why this was new for me.

up to 1 a (as far as) hasta; up to the ceiling/edge hasta el techo/el borde; the water was already up to his chest el agua ya le llegaba al pecho;

But, "up to" in "if it were up to me" sounded strange.

Then, fortunately, I looked on the Internet. And I have found this:

As far as or approaching a certain point. For example, The water was nearly up to the windowsill, or They allowed us up to two hours to finish the test, or This seed should yield up to 300 bushels per acre. [c. a.d. 950] 2. be up to. Be able to do or deal with, as in When I got home, she asked if I was up to a walk on the beach. This usage is often put negatively, that is, not be up to something, as in He's not up to a long drive. [Late 1700s] 3. Occupied with, engaged in, as in What have you been up to lately? This usage can mean "devising" or "scheming," as in We knew those two were up to something. It also appears in up to no good, meaning "occupied with or devising something harmful," as in I'm sure those kids are up to no good. [First half of 1800s] 4. Dependent on, as in The success of this project is up to us. [c. 1900] Also see the following idioms beginning with up to.

Under my point of view if I replace "up to" with "por o para" you can guess the meaning more or less.

Then, there seem be three meanings for "up to": hasta, por o para.


updated SEP 9, 2009
edited by nila45
posted by nila45