can you say this for "they must" etc

0
votes

So far in my lessons, I've learned
I HAVE TO SERVE is TENGO QUE SERVIR
HE HAS TO SERVE is TIENE QUE SERVIR
SHE HAS TO BUY is TIENE QUE COMPRAR

so if I want to say:

Your wife and daughter must show the consular,
Can you say:
Su esposa y su hija, tienen que mostrar el Consulado,...

Rachel

1718 views
updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by RachelC

9 Answers

0
votes

I haven't quite worked though all the above points, but I will.
I learned some new words with this exercise, demostrar being one of them.

Here is my new translation:

Su esposa y hija deben demostrar a la Consulado, la persona que las entrevistas para su visado, que tienen la intención de regresar a El Salvador.

No basta con la promesa de volver. Deben ser capaces de demostrar, a un observador objetivo, que es más probable que no, a regresar a El Salvador.
Esta prueba puede ser en las siguientes formas.

Que podría mostrar lo siguiente:

  1. Tienen cuentas bancarias con dinero u otros bienes personales en El Salvador, que es probable que no serían dispuestos a abandonar;
  2. Son dueños de bienes inmuebles en El Salvador, como una casa, que es poco probable que estén dispuestos a abandonar;
  3. Ellas tienen familiares cercanos, como los niños que es poco probable que estén dispuestos a abandonar;

Ellas tienen familiares cercanos, como los niños que sería poco probable que estén dispuestos a abandonar.

Por favor, haga una lista, incluyendo cualquiera de los factores mencionados que podrían aplicarse en su situación.

Su esposa tendrá que convencer a la oficina consular, que tienen la intención de volver a El Salvador después de su visita a los EE.UU. Por lo tanto, los más factores que demostrarían su probabilidad de regresar allí, el mejor. No hacerlo en el pasado y eso es la razón que ella se negó una visa. Debido a que ahora ella está aplicando una visa con su hija, será aún más difícil de demostrar la intención necesaria y probabilidad a regresar.

La hija también tendrá que demostrar lo anterior. Si está matriculada en escuela cursos allí que se propone continuar después de su visita, luego que ella sería lista esto así como cualesquiera otros factores que podría aplicarse en su caso.

Does it read ok now?

Thanks,
Rachel

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by RachelC
0
votes

Su esposa y su hija deben demostrar al [del]la[/del] Consulado (que ...).

a + el = al

Note that the concept has now changed to showing (demonstrating) something to the Consulate, which "something" was left off the sentence.

That is correct, Rachel. The comma after "hija" is unnecessary, though.

I don't think so! This is what the sentence means:

Su esposa y su hija, tienen que mostrar el Consulado,... =

Your wife and your daughter, (unnecessarily long pause), have to show (other people) the Consulate

If you say "mostrar el consulado", since "el consulado" has no preposition, it is the thing that you are showing to other people.

This is what I assumed she meant, given the verb mostrar and the ellipsis (...) after consulado in her original sentence (which I assumed would indicate to whom they were going to show it). Although I thought it would not be all that common, it is definitely possible. For example: "Su esposa y su hija tienen que mostrar el Consulado a los compatriotas que apenas llegaron."

Without more context, I didn't take the liberty to assume that she intended a completely different idea that required a different verb. (Besides, the point of her question was the conjugation of "tener que" in the singular and plural. That is obvious from the title and the examples preceding the sentence in question.) If we had had the entire sentence, we would have known if "el Consulado" was intended to be the DO or the IO, and if the concept was "mostrar" or "demostrar."

Maybe you shouldn't be so quick to rush to judgment without considering all the possibilities.

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
votes

Maybe you shouldn't be so quick to rush to judgment without considering all the possibilities.

I don't think Lazarus was rushing to judge the statement "Su esposa y su hija, tienen que mostrar el Consulado". Even I thought "show the consulate what" as it looked incomplete. I must admit it didn't occur to me that it could mean show the consulate to someone, but it did look incomplete.

Of course it was incomplete, as were all the examples she gave in her post. The point of her question was the conjugation of "tener que," not the nuance of anything that followed it. If you will notice her original post, ...

So far in my lessons, I've learned

I HAVE TO SERVE is TENGO QUE SERVIR

HE HAS TO SERVE is TIENE QUE SERVIR

SHE HAS TO BUY is TIENE QUE COMPRAR

so if I want to say:

Your wife and daughter must show the consular,

Can you say:

Su esposa y su hija, tienen que mostrar el Consulado,...

Rachel

... you will see that the sentence in question was the only one that had an ellipsis (...), indicating that she knew that something followed, but it was not relevant to her question and would be a waste of effort and space to type it.

Lazarus's post that followed mine did not address the OP's question, but rather attempted to refute my affirmation ("That is correct, Rachel."), which was referring to her conjugation of tener que, which was the point of her question. Since her conjugation of tener que was, in fact, correct, my point is that he rushed to judge that the irrelevant portion of the sentence was incorrect, when in fact, it wasn't necessarily so. When I say "rush to judge," I mean that he didn't consider all the possibilities, including a very logical one, before condemning the sentence as incorrect and assuming that a completely different concept was intended.

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
votes

Maybe you shouldn't be so quick to rush to judgment without considering all the possibilities.

I don't think Lazarus was rushing to judge the statement "Su esposa y su hija, tienen que mostrar el Consulado". Even I thought "show the consulate what" as it looked incomplete. I must admit it didn't occur to me that it could mean show the consulate to someone, but it did look incomplete.

I know this is not the same but it reminded of "the ship sank". The ship sank what'

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Maybe you shouldn't be so quick to rush to judgment without considering all the possibilities.

I don't think Lazarus was rushing to judge the statement "Su esposa y su hija, tienen que mostrar el Consulado". Even I thought "show the consulate what" as it looked incomplete. I must admit it didn't occur to me that it could mean show the consulate to someone, but it did look incomplete.

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

SO:

Su esposa y su hija deben demostrar al la Consulado

AND NOT

Su esposa y su hija deben mostrar al la Consulado

Does "MOSTRAR" become a different word/meaning when you ad the DE (DEMOSTRAR)

Mostrar is "to show", and "demostrar" is "to demonstrate".

If you say "mostrar el consulado", since "el consulado" has no preposition, it is the thing that you are showing to other people.

The person to whom you are showing something, the indirect object, requires the preposition "a". The thing (or people) that you show takes no preposition.

mostrar algo a alguien

The other problem is, unless this is different in other countries, that "consular" in Spanish means "from the consulate". You don't show things to adjectives, but to people. If you want to say "show something to the Consulate", refering to anyone working there who deals with this issues, you can say "mostrar algo al Consulado", but if I remember correctly, the orignal paragraph mentioned a particular person, so you probably have to say "delegado/empleado/oficial... consular", depending on what is normally used in this cases.

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

That is correct, Rachel. The comma after "hija" is unnecessary, though.

I don't think so! This is what the sentence means:

Su esposa y su hija, tienen que mostrar el Consulado,... =

Your wife and your daughter, (unnecessarily long pause), have to show (other people) the Consulate

SO:

Su esposa y su hija deben demostrar al la Consulado

AND NOT
Su esposa y su hija deben mostrar al la Consulado ?
or would the above be correct if you say "al la Consulado" ?

Is "MOSTRAR" a completely different word/meaning than DEMOSTRAR (demonstrate), or does it only change because of the context of the sentence?

Rachel

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by RachelC
0
votes

That is correct, Rachel. The comma after "hija" is unnecessary, though.

I don't think so! This is what the sentence means:

Su esposa y su hija, tienen que mostrar el Consulado,... =
Your wife and your daughter, (unnecessarily long pause), have to show (other people) the Consulate

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

That is correct, Rachel. The comma after "hija" is unnecessary, though.

updated AGO 5, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco