HomeQ&AWhy would ser and estar break their own rule with using estar for spacial relationships.

Why would ser and estar break their own rule with using estar for spacial relationships.

0
votes

Why would ser and estar break their own rule with using estar for spatial relationships. They do not change unless a new airport is built or you move. Is that the answer?

El aeropuerto está lejos de la ciudad. The airport is far from the city.

Tu habitación está en el tercer piso. Your room is on the third floor.

2630 views
updated AGO 30, 2009
posted by usesites

6 Answers

2
votes

I don't follow your argument.

In both your examples estar is used for spatial relationships.

Where is the rule "breaker"?

Are you saying that using estar for spatial relationship breaks the permanent/temporary rule. If so, look at this article which tells you not to use the temporary/permanent "rule"

ser/estar

updated OCT 25, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
1
vote

I think Useitas is referring to a general "rule" I have heard that Ser refers to things that are permanent, while Estar refers to things that are subject to change.

Actually that's more of an observation than a "rule", because Estar is the verb used to refer to location, even for immutable objects.

And really...even those examples don't break the "rule" because airports and rooms can be moved to someplace else!

updated OCT 25, 2009
posted by Goyo
0
votes

Have a look at this link

SER Y ESTAR

updated AGO 30, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Why would ser and estar break their own rule with using estar for spatial relationships. They do not change unless a new airport is built or you move. Is that the answer?

Move? Rule? You've been cheated, mate. The so called temporary-permanent rule fails over 35% of the time on average (tossing a coin you get it wrong 50% of the time). I wouldn't call that a rule, but a lie.

updated AGO 30, 2009
edited by 00494d19
posted by lazarus1907
typo - 00494d19, AGO 30, 2009
0
votes

Spacial relationships have to do with location and you always use estar for locations

updated AGO 30, 2009
edited by BellaMargarita
posted by BellaMargarita
0
votes

Yes, you followed it just right. Please add the "article" not to use temporary/permanent "rule." Did you forget to post it. I can not find a link.

That messes up my MNEMONIC TECHNIQUE, unless the I remember the locations can change.

updated AGO 29, 2009
posted by usesites
the words "ser/estar" are a link in qfreed's post ;) - Valerie, AGO 29, 2009
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