HomeQ&AManá Lyrics Help

Maná Lyrics Help

0
votes

Could someone please help me to understand the lyrics from this awesome Maná song?

Cómo quisiera poder vivir sin aire Cómo quisiera vivir sin agua Me encantaría Querete un poco menos Cómo quisiera poder vivir sin ti

8406 views
updated SEP 3, 2009
posted by ToLife

18 Answers

2
votes

I found this web page with a complete translation. Seems to be fine for what I can see.

Lyrics

updated MAR 24, 2011
posted by 00e657d4
1
vote

It's me one more time lol i should write [ Como Quisiera means to like do something but can not do it ]such the lyric says, I'll give you my example--------> [Como Quisiera ver a mi amigo pero no puedo por que esta en los Estados Unidos] which means [I would like to see my friend but i can't becuase is in USA so como qusiera is a phrase that you can use to express what would you like to do but YOU can NOT do it thankssss -)

updated AGO 7, 2011
posted by Party
1
vote

Como quisiera is meaning [as if you could do something] so he is saying that he wants and like do something well thát's what i think grin

updated SEP 3, 2009
posted by Party
1
vote

It is a poetical usage, like rhetorical language. More than likely you would never talk in an everyday conversation this way.

updated SEP 3, 2009
posted by joeWaverage
1
vote

wouldn't that mean that we have to translate it to mean something in the past?

I wouldn't get locked in with the names of the tenses in Spanish.

Spanish uses the present tense to sometimes express the future (I am going tomorrow) or even the past.

So why not accept the past subjunctive tense to express the conditional tense?

You might wish to confirm the translation of quisiera as "I would like" in this article.

quisiera vs querría

updated SEP 3, 2009
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
Thanks, Q. Yep, I got really confused by calling it "preterit" when we are using the "conditional!" - --Mariana--, AGO 26, 2009
1
vote

Right, and that's how I interpreted "quisiera" in the song lyrics, as "I would like"

However, Eddy says "quisiera" is the preterit subjunctive here. In that case, wouldn't that mean that we have to translate it to mean something in the past?

updated SEP 3, 2009
posted by --Mariana--
1
vote

Marianne, I don't understand your question. We are answering this in the conditional in English:

Quisiera ir al cine: I would like to go ....

updated SEP 3, 2009
posted by 00494d19
Yes, the conditional is how I would use "quisiera" in this case. - --Mariana--, AGO 26, 2009
1
vote

Eddy,

I have to wonder: if we use "quisiera as the past subjunctive of "querer," why aren't we translating the text to the past tense in English, i.e., "I would have."

updated SEP 3, 2009
edited by --Mariana--
posted by --Mariana--
1
vote

Thanks, everyone. Can someone then help me to understand why the subjunctive preterite is being used. Is it because an emotion or desire is being spoken of? I am working very hard to understand the subjunctive and have read a lot about the word "que" being an important word to look for. But, here the word "cómo" is used. Can someone explain how that is triggering the use of the subjunctive preterite?

updated SEP 3, 2009
posted by ToLife
1
vote

Hi Guillermo I modified my interpretation as the poster appeared to be fixated on "Quisiera"

updated SEP 3, 2009
edited by Eddy
posted by Eddy
1
vote

Look at this link

Querer

updated SEP 3, 2009
edited by Eddy
posted by Eddy
1
vote

So, "quisiera" is what tense and what does it actually mean?

updated SEP 3, 2009
posted by ToLife
1
vote

How I would love to be able to survive without air

How I would love to be able to survive without water

How I would really like to not love you as much as I do

How I would love to be able to survive without you.

This is not a literal translation but an interpretation of what is intended.

updated SEP 3, 2009
edited by Eddy
posted by Eddy
So, "quisiera" is what tense and what does it actually mean? - ToLife, AGO 26, 2009
quisiera, past subjunctive of querer, I would like. - Eddy, AGO 26, 2009
I modified my interpretation to highlight querer. - Eddy, AGO 26, 2009
1
vote

A native speaker can give you a much better interpretation, but here's the general idea:

As I would like to live without air; As I would like to live without water; I would love to love you a little less; As I would like to live without you.

updated SEP 3, 2009
posted by --Mariana--
1
vote

Look here:

There are several examples of the use of this tense in different situations. For what I understand, the use in this song is similar to the use with "ojalá". You wish for something that is not possible.

updated AGO 26, 2009
edited by 00e657d4
posted by 00e657d4
very nice article. Thanks for posting it. - 0074b507, AGO 26, 2009
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